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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

between geography and imperial emigration. 31 Racist ideologies constructed a variety of environments throughout the British Empire as healthful for Anglo-Celts. As previous chapters have shown, Canada was portrayed as a healthy place, a northern environment of strength where ‘British stock’ thrived. 32 To advance the Canadian climate as being easy for British immigrants to acclimatize to, the Canadian

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

break with previous policy and a search for a new and different solution to the problem of Caribbean sugar. In the eighteenth century, the West Indian colonies were said to be the richest part of the British Empire, and in 1770 it was estimated that the annual profits from Caribbean sugar were £1.7 million. 7 Sugar from British imperial sources was privileged in the British market from the beginning. From 1651, the Navigation Acts restricted foreign imports to England and its colonies by dictating that only English ships could take goods to the

in Science at the end of empire
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Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice
Charles V. Reed

, knowledge, migration, military power, and political intervention’, as Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton argue, ‘allowed certain communities to assert their influence and sovereignty over other groups’. 6 In the British Empire, information itself, neither free nor evenly distributed, was regulated and controlled by the growing cultural resonance of racialised settler discourses, recently empowered

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts
Markku Hokkanen

authority as a government MO by assuming sole responsibility for medical certification. Leprosy collaboration in the interwar era As elsewhere in the British Empire, leprosy relief in Malawi brought government and missions together in formal collaboration in the interwar period. The government subsidised the treatment of leprosy patients through modest sums and

in Beyond the state
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

immigration spokesperson Laura Thompson wrote in 1926: Should we now not recognize that Canada’s continuance as part of the British Empire may be imperiled by a failure to build up a population resolved to remain loyal to that Empire? Should we now allow ourselves to be timorous as to the possibility of Canada, this

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

During the 1930s, episodes of violent protest by the inhabitants of Britain’s Caribbean colonies brought the extremely poor living and working conditions that existed in these territories to domestic and international attention. Revelations of widespread unemployment, squalid housing and malnutrition threatened the moral authority of British rule and provided fuel for critics of British imperialism. As a result, Britain made a commitment to improving living conditions in an area of the British Empire that it had previously neglected. This

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

equated the suffering of Jews in Germany with blacks in the British colonies, especially those in the white settler societies. In an article which carried the title ‘The British empire is worst racket yet invented by man’ he indicted the British for exercising in southern Africa the ‘most blatant expression of racial superiority’, which produced for the blacks a situation ‘more tragic even than that of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
John Marriott

Meridian. The British Empire and the World, 1780–1830 , London, Longman, 1989, p. 7.

in The other empire
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples
David Killingray

proclaim to predominantly white congregations the Christian message of a colour-blind society, which he believed essential if the British empire were to survive. By the late 1920s Moody realised that the ingrained racial prejudice that he continued to experience in Britain needed to be opposed by more systematic action and better directed pressure. In 1931, with the support of Quakers, he founded the League of Coloured Peoples

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

instance of an Indigenous person who had been elected (and by more than 60 per cent of the total vote) as head of government of a former colony of settlement, or White Dominion, in the old British Empire. It has never happened, and is perhaps unlikely to happen in the near future, in other former settler colonies. That this event occurred in South Africa is a striking illustration of the major political change which had taken

in Equal subjects, unequal rights