Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh

. While the local researchers in Tacloban sought resilience at household and community level, the discourses Meza identifies in Colombia function at the level of the individual and denies the sort of local, familial and historical connections which might lend momentum to political claims against the neoliberal state extraction which he sees as driving displacement. The second empirical article picks up on this thread by situating individual actions regarding child marriage within broader socio-cultural dynamics. Michelle Lokot, Lisa DiPangrazio, Dorcas Acen, Veronica

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned from an Intervention by Médecins Sans Frontières
Maria Ximena Di Lollo, Elena Estrada Cocina, Francisco De Bartolome Gisbert, Raquel González Juarez, and Ana Garcia Mingo

expanded to other regions of the country, but the level of collaboration with authorities and amount of access to care homes varied between different autonomous communities ( comunidades autónomas ). We do not have a clear understanding as to why we were granted access to some care homes and not others. Two options were considered: to concentrate all efforts in a few care homes or try to reach as many centres as possible. Given the urgency and lack of data, MSF opted for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

humanitarian interventions. The topic was thrust upon me by events in Rwanda in 1994. As a teenage, second-generation Rwandan immigrant in Belgium, I was more personally affected than fellow classmates by the hypocrisy of the international community: the preaching of respect for human rights, followed by their omission during one hundred days of mass murder before the eyes of the world. It felt like there was more to the story than ‘good intentions versus regrettable outcomes’. Ever since, I have worried about the content and purpose of (Western

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada, and Róisín Read

Most mainstream discourses on humanitarian security would not consider the community engagement of a team of anthropologists in three West African countries during the Ebola epidemic of 2014–16 as directly related to security – and their article in this special issue on ‘Security and Protection’ hardly touches on security as its own topic. Instead, it provides a detailed account of the need for a thorough understanding of social relationships when defining, and thus securing, humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller and Gemma Sou

to provide meaningful assistance to communities in crisis in the future. Scott-Smith’s paper shifts attention to humanitarian architecture, arguing that the humanitarian sector often relies on an uncritical technophilia, which fetishises objects rather than focusing on politics and process. Using shelter as his site of analysis, he suggests that ‘buildings without architecture’ are bound to fall short of the socio-spatial challenges of producing appropriate, diverse and affordable

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

, South Sudanese experienced widespread food insecurity, leading to emergency and famine conditions. The international community responded to the crises with humanitarian assistance. South Sudan has become one of the world’s largest humanitarian emergencies. Over the duration of the conflict, optimism and support of the international community shifted, to the extent that many donors were/are no longer willing to support the government. As violence escalated, the government and specific individuals were sanctioned. The Government of South Sudan (GoSS) responded with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Nazanin Zadeh-Cummings and Lauren Harris

through a combination of political choices and repressive control, the DPRK has engineered a largely man-made (though also environmentally impacted) situation of humanitarian need. However, this does not absolve the organised international community from the humanitarian imperative to respond to suffering wherever it is found, or from ensuring the sanctions regime does not negatively impact aid. As the first point of the Red Cross and NGO Code of Conduct affirms: ‘The humanitarian imperative comes first …. As members of the international community, we recognise our

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
Aditya Sarkar, Benjamin J. Spatz, Alex de Waal, Christopher Newton, and Daniel Maxwell

and alleviating suffering in a conflict or crisis in relation to a much wider set of goals – around livelihood protection, governance, resilience, conflict resolution and others that align with the ‘triple nexus’ of humanitarian action, development and peacebuilding. Third, we recognise that the ‘humanitarian community’ is not a monolithic entity. It consists of different types of groups and movements, often with contradictory ideas about how the broad goal of saving lives

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, the focus of this paper is late-capitalism’s absorption and reproduction of the informal economies of the global South, especially the role of post-humanitarianism in governing global precarity. The question of social reproduction is important here. Encompassing the reproduction of human beings as a biological species, social reproduction is an organic part of capitalism. It includes birthing and caring for the young, sick and old while maintaining family, friendship and wider community linkages, identities and moralities ( Fraser, 2016

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Bert Ingelaere

South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission the question arises: what kinds of truth surfaced in the actual gacaca assemblage in small face-to-face communities? And what kind of truth dominated? And how did these truths interact? I will answer these questions based on fieldwork conducted in Rwanda between 2005 and 2012 – when the gacaca courts were operational nationwide – when I, together with Rwandan collaborators, observed a total of 1,917 trials dealing with allegations against 2,573 individuals. In doing so, I conceptualise the gacaca process as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs