Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

conflict studies. The turn to hybridity 179 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making has included a focus on resistance and provided a more grounded critique of peacebuilding. But resistance remains under-theorised, given how subjects and their aims are left undefined. The everyday framework of James Scott and Michel de Certeau that this book has drawn on places the agency of resistance on subordinated subjects, on patterns in power relations and on different types of acts that are context specific. In the militarised and complex context of the DRC, practices

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

depathologise ‘failed’ states. The chapter starts with a discussion of Weberian historical sociology in order to analyse not only coercion, extraction and claims to legitimacy as constitutive practices of states, but also how informal and plural forms of governance do not make the DRC pathological; in fact, they characterise the nature of peacebuilding as a plural and improvised form of ruling. This is illustrated with some empirical examples in the fourth section of the chapter. Before that, a third section analyses both Africa’s normality and exceptionalism. It first

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making

Given the significant similarities and differences between the welfare states of Northern Europe and their reactions to the perceived 'refugee crisis' of 2015, the book focuses primarily on the three main cases of Denmark, Sweden and Germany. Placed in a wider Northern European context – and illustrated by those chapters that also discuss refugee experiences in Norway and the UK – the Danish, Swedish and German cases are the largest case studies of this edited volume. Thus, the book contributes to debates on the governance of non-citizens and the meaning of displacement, mobility and seeking asylum by providing interdisciplinary analyses of a largely overlooked region of the world, with two specific aims. First, we scrutinize the construction of the 2015 crisis as a response to the large influx of refugees, paying particular attention to the disciplinary discourses and bureaucratic structures that are associated with it. Second, we investigate refugees’ encounters with these bureaucratic structures and consider how these encounters shape hopes for building a new life after displacement. This allows us to show that the mobility of specific segments of the world’s population continues to be seen as a threat and a risk that has to be governed and controlled. Focusing on the Northern European context, our volume interrogates emerging policies and discourses as well as the lived experiences of bureaucratization from the perspective of individuals who find themselves the very objects of bureaucracies.

Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

and religious equipment. (Scott 1985: 331) A Statebuilders and state-recipients, a pose uthority is generally claimed with an underlying morality. Peacebuilding, and the reconstruction of state authority, is deployed as the best solution to the problems of war, authoritarianism and poverty (Chandler 2010a: 1). In Eastern DRC this authority claim has materialised as a discourse of protection and social change. Against this discursive construction, mockery, denigration and slandering operate as an intentional mechanism to deny the legitimacy and authority of

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Open Access (free)
Resistance and the liberal peace: a missing link
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

before; but they continue because we need a political negotiation, a land reform, jobs and a real democracy where people can participate and not just be put in jail. (Union Paysanne pour le Développement Intégral Representative 2014) T hese statements reflect some important sentiments of those who have experienced war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes since the 1990s.1 They imply an interpretation of the conflict as stemming from several overlapping economic and political issues that cannot be reduced to a military issue, a problem of

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

6 Creative survival as subversion I Solidarities and creative tactics against ‘conditions of death’1 n the DRC, the exercise and consolidation of state authority does not necessarily imply social transformation or a real commitment of the state to impose itself but, rather, the management of state absences and state presences through a plurality of authorities. Still, the patterns of coercion and extraction that have followed from the 20 years of conflict, with the different state-making and peacebuilding processes, determine the conditions for the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Martin Joormann

’ (Canning, 2019). Persons sorted into the first category are to be expelled to the country where they were registered as having entered Europe, as defined by the Dublin system (currently Dublin III, officially called EU Regulation 604/2013). The second category, ‘manifestly unfounded’, means that protection is denied. These decisions can be appealed by a veto of the Danish Refugee Council (DRC), which is ‘an umbrella organisation consisting of members broadly representing civil society organisations in Denmark committed to the refugee cause’ (DRC, 2019). Such a veto moves

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Current policy options and issues
Jenny H. Peterson

which have become a defining feature of the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). 16 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 17 War economy transformation: policy issues A related cluster of targeted policies, which can broadly be referred to as resource governance initiatives, are also central to transformation. Including privatisation, anti-corruption/transparency programmes and resource-sharing mechanisms, this body of reforms seeks to improve public and private management systems related to resources, thus preventing them from

in Building a peace economy?
A view from below
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

motivated by the desire to avoid, tame or challenge domination? The everyday framework of resistance does not offer a measuring tape to ascertain unambiguously which acts constitute resistance and which ones do not. It offers a framework to understand patterns of actions in a particular relationship. In the next chapter, it will be shown that the case of the Great Lakes region, and the DRC in particular, provides a possibility for examining both generalities and particularities, making it suitable to exploring the framework of everyday resistance in a peacebuilding

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
James Thompson

[B]y focusing on care, we focus on the process by which life is sustained; we focus on human actors acting. (Robinson, 1999 : 31) In 2012, my colleague Antoine Muvunyi, a drama worker from eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), lived in Manchester with my family and me for over six months. He survived an incident in which seven of his co-workers and friends had been killed and spent his time in the UK having surgery and physiotherapy on his injured elbow. The chapter that follows, and the orientation it proposes, makes sense only in light of

in Performing care