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This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

What contribution to regional security?

2504Chap11 7/4/03 12:41 pm Page 208 11 The Black Sea Economic Cooperation: what contribution to regional security?1 Panagiota Manoli The Black Sea region has been extensively referred to as a bridge, indicating its link with Europe to the West and Asia to the East. As a crossroad of geography, cultures and religions, the Black Sea region presents opportunities for both cooperation and conflict among the region’s states. Developments in this area cannot be viewed in isolation, but always in the context of events taking place in Europe and in Central Asia

in Limiting institutions?

and contributed directly to the capacity of allied nations to deploy troops to the region in the post-September 11 anti-terrorist coalition. The PfP has evolved into an exemplary model of institutionalised civilmilitary cooperation among over forty European and Eurasian states. The success of the PfP has had an important impact feeding back into NATO, thus facilitating NATO’s own post-Cold War survival. None the less, the future of PfP will depend heavily on whether NATO can adapt adequately to the kinds of post-September 11 threats confronting both allies and

in Limiting institutions?

its first eight months in office had been unilateralist in its approach to international issues, embraced a multilateral approach to security that also harkened back to the Cold War. With NATO invoking Article 5 for the first time in its history, the European allies provided enormous diplomatic and law enforcement support to the United States – especially in the immediate aftermath of September 11. Subsequently, the United States military response in Afghanistan created some unease in western Europe, which was exacerbated by the ‘axis of evil’ reference in the

in Limiting institutions?

2504Chap8 7/4/03 12:40 pm Page 144 8 The OSCE role in Eurasian security P. Terrence Hopmann A wide range of institutions have appeared in the Eurasian region since the end of the Cold War that have a role to play in Eurasian security. Indeed, it has often been observed that Europe after 1989 is ‘institutionally thick’, that is, it is crisscrossed by an extensive web of multilateral institutions designed to prevent, deter, manage and resolve conflicts that might appear in the region once occupied by the former Communist states of the Soviet Union and its

in Limiting institutions?

embodiment of some transcendent truth or goodness, increasingly linked to Christian Orthodoxy.17 This is often connected with an image of Russia as essentially a Eurasian ‘great power’. In contrast, an equally important tendency identi32 2504Chap2 7/4/03 12:38 pm Page 33 Contested national identities fies Russia as fully European, and as such set apart from America with regard to culture and security concerns.18 Both narratives, however, share a predominantly geopolitical orientation to world politics. Another common feature is an insistence on maintaining

in Limiting institutions?
Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s

into the UNO, following its liquidation in October, but one of its closing actions was ‘to establish an international children’s fund for care of minors in liberated countries’. 23 A year later, in October 1947, Gertrude Samuels accused the ICEF (International Children’s Emergency Fund) of failing the tens of millions of children in Europe and Asia, but welcomed the plans for a UN Appeal for Children in 1948. 24 For Chester

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

concentration and later democratisation that ultimately reflects the unfolding of the modern European nation-state. The benefit of the Weberian tradition is to offer a relatively simple formula that allows us to sharpen the perspective about the continuities, changes, specificities and generalities of different states and different past and contemporary state-making processes. In this book, state-making (and peacebuilding/ statebuilding) is a process of asserting, consolidating and exercising rule through the management of violence and wealth that has both national and

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
The dynamics of multilateralism in Eurasia

principal regional institutions have largely failed to cultivate cooperative multilateralism. Can they do so singularly or in combination in the future? Multilateral form and the security dilemma The basic conditions underlying western models of multilateral institutional cooperation do not exist in Eurasia.3 In the transatlantic context, the major institutions reflected a benign American hegemony and acquiescent western European states. NATO, for example, survives because its combination of American power and institutional attributes enhanced cooperation between its

in Limiting institutions?
Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism

on ITV and the BBC, screened at the House of Commons, and shown by television stations across Europe and the Commonwealth. The documentary’s massive impact spurred donations to the largest humanitarian NGOs, while galvanising government officials into taking action. Dimbleby’s film also had significant political consequences inside Ethiopia, as opposition movements utilised its shocking images of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture