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The St Vincent and the Grenadines context
Philip Nanton

Plantation offers a rehearsal of the contradictory European metropolitan notions of civilisation and how they were visited on the Caribbean. He points out that work, however brutally organised, was equated with order and civilisation. He analyses in considerable detail the contradictory links, explored by Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope and James Anthony Froude, among them the presumed laziness of slaves

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Will Kymlicka and Sue Donaldson

immigrants who had settled long term in European countries, such as the Turkish Gastarbeiter in Germany, yet who were not eligible for citizenship. Indeed, even their children, born and raised in the country, were sometimes ineligible for citizenship (Walzer 1983 ). Walzer argued compellingly that this was an injustice. These long-time residents were clearly members of society, not just in the sense that they paid taxes and obeyed the law, but in

in Democratic inclusion
Philip Nanton

long remained a rural, black, peasant-led organisation 4 with links to African cultural and behavioural retentions. 5 It was perceived as a rural threat because it was independent of European influence and beyond establishment control. The identification of Shaker practice with African cultural retentions added to the generalised moral panic of the respectable authorities. Thus the 1905 report of

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mads Qvortrup

become almost mythological, and is well known even to less than avid readers of the European Canon. The story of the watch-maker’s son from Geneva who failed to return to his apprenticeship, when he found himself locked out of the city, and the tale of how he – a young man abandoned by his father5 – was taken in by Mme de Warrens, who converted him to Catholicism (and then seduced him!), is often retold. All this has become part of the tapestry of Western Kulturgeschichte. So too have the misdeeds of the famous and progressive educationalist who abandoned his own

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mads Qvortrup

populations in Europe continued to accept the literal truth of the Bible and the existence of a Christian order, those in the forefront of the new scientific and intellectual movements had been ‘alienated from a Church that insisted on the literal truth of revelation’ (Hampson 1990: 94). It was left to d’Holbach, in his Système de la nature, to assert, with characteristic bluntness, that there was no divine purpose and no master plan: The whole cannot have an object, for outside itself there is nothing towards which it can tend … Men have completely failed to see that this

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
David Miller

–120 . Miller , David 2014 . “ Debatable Lands .” International Theory 6 : 104–121 . Miller , David 2016 . Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration . Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press . Miller David and Sundas Ali . 2014 . “ Testing the National Identity Argument .” European Political Science Review 6

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Philip Nanton

). 4 A letter to Searchlight , an SVG newspaper, written by one Samantha Smart (a possible pseudonym), claimed: ‘The real truth is that the European elite in Canouan have no love for black people, have no appreciation of the beauty of Afro-Caribbean culture, no respect for Vincentian traditions and individuals. The real truth is that management does

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Some questions for Rainer Bauböck
Joseph H. Carens

of their most fundamental rights under the law, simply because of the colour of their skin, even though they are formally entitled to equal protection. The problem may be worse in the United States than elsewhere, but it is certainly a serious problem in Canada as well (where indigenous people are also particularly subject to this reality) and I think it is safe to say that neither are European states immune. Now think also about the role

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

act of reason’ as an ‘aesthetic act’. Philosophical reflections on beauty and art have, of course, been around in Western thought since Plato, and Platonic ideas clearly influenced Hegel, Schelling and Hölderlin, but it is only around the middle of the eighteenth century in Europe that the notion of a distinct area of philosophy called ‘aesthetics’ develops. Between the end of the eighteenth and the end of the nineteenth century the relationship between art and the rest of philosophy undergoes a radical transformation, a transformation that is connected, as we shall

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis
Andrew Bowie

subject, an ‘it’. We already encountered some of the difficulties which emerge in the attempts of the I to understand itself in Kant’s ‘transcendental deduction’. During the later part of the eighteenth century, as the passages from Rousseau and Lichtenberg make clear, the nature of the self becomes a vital philosophical and cultural issue in many different areas of European society. Interestingly, the ways in which this issue are explored tend to produce very conflicting results. On the one hand, the I is often seen as what is required for the world to be intelligible at

in Aesthetics and subjectivity