Catherine Baker

2012 ). Habsburg authorities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, for instance, tackled what they perceived as an Ottoman legacy of endemic backwardness through extensive public health programmes. The Czech-, Russian- and Polish-speaking, Swiss-trained women physicians they hired to visit Muslim women in ‘the harems’ (as per one 1903 public health report) took British women doctors' work in the gender-segregated Indian ‘zenana’ as a model, making Bosnia-Herzegovina ‘the object of a characteristically colonial discourse’ (Fuchs 2011 : 76, 85; see Burton 1996 ). Habsburg

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Elisha P. Renne

Muslim Women of Nigeria) participation on immunisation teams. These efforts have also included community rallies and the solicitation of support from Muslim teachers, religious leaders and governors. Health officials organised a meeting at the offices of the Jam’atu Nasril Islam in Kaduna to encourage Muslim clerics in northern Kaduna State to advise their followers to vaccinate their children for polio. 77 In 2013, the Gates Foundation began a

in The politics of vaccination
Barbra Mann Wall

also were needed to teach birth control and counter the work of Protestants in this arena. Anna Dengel, a sister physician who had worked in India and who actively petitioned the Vatican, was especially concerned about caring for Muslim women who lived in seclusion through the practice of purdah. Thus, the Church finally lifted the ban in 1936.14 The edict made it possible for Marie Martin, an Irish nurse and midwife, to establish the MMM in Nigeria in 1937, with the motherhouse in Drogheda, Ireland. Bishop Charles Heerey, vicar-apostolate in Onitsha and Owerri

in Colonial caring
Antonia Lucia Dawes

showcase his linguistic aptitude in the languages of the privileged and wealthy female tourists. The South Asians were described as terrorists because of the hijab the women in the group were wearing. This drew on widespread Islamophobic ideas whereby the trope of the oppressed and veiled Muslim women symbolised concerns about the threat of terrorism to western society (Rashid 2016 ). The flirtatious language invoked with regard to the female tourists was of a different register. Being able to speak English or French to the visiting young women connected the young

in Race talk
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

century, 41 landscapes and people were also seen primarily in visual terms. Such sights as travelling family groups or Muslim women attending the tombs of relatives at night are described as picturesque, while the flat landscape by the expansive Ganges provides a sublime prospect of ‘inexpressible grandeur’. Other landscapes are compared to England. The hard-headed George

in The other empire
Catherine Baker

see Janković ( 2012 ). 17 Sixteen-year-old Kesinović and fifteen-year-old Selimović, whose refugee parents settled in Austria in 1992–5, travelled to Syria in 2014, becoming what Western media frequently called ‘poster girls’ for the ISIS propaganda strategy of promising very young Muslim women empowerment and fulfilment by separating from their families, settling in ISIS territory, marrying jihadis and raising children who would

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Reordering privilege and prejudice
Hilary Pilkington

than British Christians by 56 per cent (2010) (Field, 2012: 151). The second element is more specific to those studied here and consists in: the sense of discrimination or persecution of ‘us’ – as EDL supporters – by the justice system and law enforcement agencies; and a wider construction of whiteness as a site of discrimination and victimisation. The rights of ‘others’ A key symbol of the two-tier system for respondents is the ‘right’ afforded to Muslim women to wear the burqa. Nine respondents called directly for the burqa to be banned in public places; some

in Loud and proud
Paul Henley

television to be shot entirely by an all-women crew. Today, it seems remarkable that there was any resistance to all-women crews, but at that time, resistance there certainly was. Indeed, Llewelyn-Davies was only able to overcome this resistance by arguing that, given its subject matter, the film could only be made with an all-women crew since no man would be permitted to film Muslim women living in seclusion ( figure 11.3 , left). One scene that would certainly have been quite impossible to shoot without an all-women crew – a scene that would later

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

the ‘civic nation’ is reimagined alongside an appeal to British values of democracy, equality, tolerance and ‘postracialism’ (Fortier 2008). We see its inflections in the commitment to integrate Muslim women out of their troubled domesticity, or in attempts to work in solidarity with refugees, or in the push to protect the rights of ‘Windrush generation’ citizens who are threatened with deportation. This humanitarian leaning and often multiculturalist nationalism ‘includes’ and even celebrates diverse others, whilst constituting them as ‘welcomed’ guests of the

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

government report which mirrored the concerns of previous immigration policies but focused on settled communities of racialised citizens. In the report the ‘dangers’ of communities living ‘separate’ or ‘ghettoised’ lives was viewed as a failed strategy of a too-generous family migration regime (Casey 2016). What made this problem worse was that ‘minority’ women, it was supposed, were failing to integrate into British society (also see Cantle 2002). Muslim women, the report argued, exemplified this trend. They were presented as lacking opportunities in the job market, bound

in Bordering intimacy