Open Access (free)
On the possibility of sustainability and democracy in advanced industrial nations
Lennart J. Lundqvist

2579Ch8 12/8/03 11:57 AM Page 201 8 Straddling the fence: on the possibility of sustainability and democracy in advanced industrial nations At the heart of this study of Sweden and its efforts to create structures and processes for ecologically rational governance has been the political dilemma posed by sustainable development. Taking as my point of departure the normative question of ‘How are we to govern ourselves so as to value democracy and individual autonomy and still retain the integrity of the commons?’ and by measuring the empirical evidence of

in Sweden and ecological governance
A critical study of social media discourses
Marie Sundström and Hedvig Obenius

8 Marie Sundström and Hedvig Obenius (De-)legitimation of migration: a critical study of social media discourses ‘She is old and sick and will not live for many more years, you have to be humane by letting her stay and not be so damn bureaucratic (two angry smileys)’.1 The quote comes from a comment adding to a discussion on Facebook about the case of Sahar, a 106-year-old woman whom the Swedish Migration Agency denied a permit to remain in Sweden.2 The Agency argued that despite Sahar’s old age and poor health, there was no reason for her not to return to the

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Open Access (free)
Governmental power and authority in democratic ecological governance
Lennart J. Lundqvist

2579Ch7 12/8/03 11:56 AM Page 181 7 Where the buck stops: governmental power and authority in democratic ecological governance Ecological governance and the authority of government The preceding chapters analysed what Sweden has done, and how far that country has come, in creating structures and processes of governance for the sustainability of the commons and the autonomy of the individual within the limits of democracy. One conclusion is that while the logic of ecological rationality may seem attractive in terms of sustainability and autonomy when laid

in Sweden and ecological governance
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

 151 9 THE INVULNERABLE BODY OF COLOUR The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative Ma r a Le e  Ge r dén I n 2016, the Swedish Film Institute launched the Fusion Programme, the aim of which was to promote diversity in Swedish film production. The announcement of the Fusion Programme emphasised innovation, intersectional analysis, and feminist and anti-​racist perspectives on artistic practices. The question of representation is also central, which is reflected in the guidelines for the applicants: ‘Applicants must identify himself [sic] as

in The power of vulnerability
Contesting the meaning of the 2015 refugee crisis in Sweden
Admir Skodo

3 Admir Skodo Lesson for the future or threat to sovereignty? Contesting the meaning of the 2015 refugee crisis in Sweden Following the entry of 162,877 asylum seekers in 2015, Sweden introduced border controls in November of that year. These were followed by new laws in 2015–2016 that curtailed the possibility of being granted permanent residence, family reunification, and the social rights of asylum seekers. Such measures were necessary, according to the Swedish government, because the large number of entries triggered a refugee crisis. These were far

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Sweden and the lesser powers in the long eighteenth century
Erik Bodensten

5 The problems with receiving subsidies: Sweden and the lesser powers in the long eighteenth century Erik Bodensten Introduction: Why the lesser powers sought subsidies During the long eighteenth century, subsidies constituted a necessary, albeit insufficient, method for lesser powers to achieve political and dynastic objectives. In the context of imperial and European politics, these subsidies were crucial for the ability of minor German states to defend themselves and act more proactively and offensively, in spite of their otherwise significantly limited

in Subsidies, diplomacy, and state formation in Europe, 1494–1789
Open Access (free)
Bonnie Clementsson

The early modern judicial system The secular judicial structure In comparison to many European countries, the Swedish judicial system was organised in an unusually uniform manner during the early modern period. In broad outline, it consisted of three secular judicial bodies. The first body was the local court, tinget (the Thing ), also called häradsrätten (the hundred court) in the countryside or rådhusrätten (the municipal court) in the towns. The häradshövding (hundred

in Incest in Sweden, 1680–1940
A visual analysis of four frames of representation of ‘refugeeness’ in Swedish newspapers
Jelena Jovičić

6 Jelena Jovičić Images of crisis and the crisis of images: a visual analysis of four frames of representation of ‘refugeeness’ in Swedish newspapers The period 2015–2016 in Sweden (and beyond) became largely known as the refugee crisis – a construct readily associated with a negative event or a destabilizing period of time, which can affect both individuals and larger groups and societies. The term crisis came alongside the word ‘refugee’ – a pairing which is particularly loaded and comes with highly problematic political impositions. For example, how did

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Lennart J. Lundqvist

-made systems, and thus the problems of scale and coordination in ecological governance, she recommends a spatial web of ‘nested enterprises’. Smaller-scale resource regimes are linked in multiple layers to form larger entities of resource governance (Ostrom 1990:90 ff., 101 f.). Admittedly, Ostrom’s classic study deals above all with singleinterest, single-purpose resource regimes. Ecosystems of some size are, however, usually subjected to multiple, often conflicting 2579Ch2 12/8/03 26 11:47 AM Page 26 Sweden and ecological governance claims and uses. This makes the

in Sweden and ecological governance
Germany, Sweden and Australia compared
Ashley Lavelle

1 Explanations for the neo-liberal direction of social democracy: Germany, Sweden and Australia compared Ashley Lavelle Several explanations have been put forward as to why social democrats have adopted neo-liberal policies since at least the 1980s. Ideological trends, the consequences of globalisation and European integration, and electoral factors, all get a strong mention in the literature. This chapter suggests that a more persuasive explanation for social democrats’ embrace of neo-liberalism lies with the end of the post-war boom in the early 1970s. Not

in In search of social democracy