Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Claire Jowitt

Colonialism, Jewishness and politics 129 7 ‘Books will speak plain’? Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis CLAIRE JOWITT Francis Bacon’s Of Counsel (1625) asserts that ‘Books will speak plain when counsellors blanch.’1 In other words, a counsellor – even one like Bacon, languishing on the margins of political favour – will find it easier to offer advice to his prince through the medium of the written word. A counsellor can give better advice away from the intimidating presence of his monarch. Bacon’s statement in Of Counsel provides a

in Francis Bacon’s <i>New Atlantis</i>
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War, Debt, and Colonial Power
Tim Di Muzio and Richard H. Robbins

England and the permanent national debt that stretched English money beyond the limitations of gold and silver coinage. The move also anchored the emergence of an international credit system based on sterling and the capitalization of colonialism. The new paper currency issues remained linked to a metallic substance during this period, but the tether was extended so that the value of paper notes in circulation was never fully backed by the metallic horde at the Bank of England and other provincial banks that would spring up during the Industrial Revolution. With varying

in Debt as Power
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Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory
Jeremy C.A. Smith

migration. Through voyaging and migration, islander societies expanded, creating and sustaining zones of engagement for millennia before Europeans came. Travel stimulated an imaginary of exchange, the second theme. Exchange cannot be understood with a utilitarian mindset; it is rather an expression of relationship, association and alliance –​engagement broadly speaking. The third theme is the new world context. European colonialism conjoined the Pacific to other civilisations in more extensive engagement. This was a violent and disordering historical experience for the

in Debating civilisations
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Katie Pickles

geographers’ oft-times support of empire builders, I approach the history of the IODE from a post-colonial critique of the construction of colonialism. 4 The shifting location of Anglo-Canadian identity is a continual theme. I follow Homi Bhabha when he writes of the need to ‘think beyond narratives of originary and initial subjectivities and to focus on those moments or processes that are produced in the

in Female imperialism and national identity
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Mary Chamberlain

in Paris. Alioune Diop, in his opening speech, and Senghor, in his, likened the congress to a ‘second Bandung’. The Bandung Conference in 1955, convened by the newly independent Asian states and attended by delegates from elsewhere in Asia and Africa asserted their opposition to any form of colonialism and imperialism. The Paris Congress of Negro Writers not only declared its opposition to

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds
Jeremy C.A. Smith

. Unprecedented waves of migration to and within the Atlantic world patterned the institution of American societies. Colonialism structured migration in Asia even more than in the second period. Tens of millions of indentured contract labourers moved. Some returned to their countries of origin; many joined new communities that became entrenched over time. Chinese and Indian traders were prominent in dealings with the new colonisers and lived in enclave communities of their own, whether within Asia and the Pacific or in southern or eastern Africa. Distinctly new migratory routes

in Debating civilisations
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The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

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Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

colonialism had set in motion was now being replayed in a climate of highly-charged political restlessness and mobility that was to change profoundly the national identities and cultures of both Britain and its West Indian colonies. In her later years Marson continued to travel, spending 1952 to 1960 in the US. By the time she returned to London in 1964 she was able to appreciate that a very different cultural and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

were required in order to think through the destruction of the old colonial order? From long before the arrival of Windrush in 1948, West Indian emigrants came from societies well advanced in the prerequisites of breaking from colonialism. They arrived with long memories, recalling events which, in the collective imagination of the British, had slipped into forgetfulness. 6 The typewritten novels and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Chinua Achebe’s critique of cosmopolitics
Laura Chrisman

. The same market economy that ‘frees’ Appiah works to ‘unfree’ non-metropolitan peoples.5 I want to suggest that Achebe’s Home and Exile subtly and powerfully implicates contemporary cosmopolitical thought in the historical violence practised by European colonialism in Africa. Cosmopolitan perspectives, for Achebe, are ultimately present-day expressions of the old ‘Pax Britannica’: the liberal story that Empire likes to tell about itself. That story Achebe began to explode with his 1958 classic novel Things Fall Apart, in which the colonial ‘pacification’ of the

in Postcolonial contraventions