Sabine Clarke

exactly was knowledge expected to move from the laboratory and spur development? This chapter will examine the relationship between scientific investigation and colonial development that was embodied in the new arrangements for colonial research that were created in fields such as sugar chemistry during the first half of the 1940s. The late colonial period saw an unprecedented expansion in scientific research across the Colonial Empire and in British universities, funded through the Research Fund of the 1940 CDW Act and its successors. The new

in Science at the end of empire
Sabine Clarke

, ‘who would try to get them to enter the chemical industry’. Instead, they wanted a sugar technologist to head the STL and a focus on improvements to the technical process of sugar manufacturing. Asked what their aim was, the BWISA responded that they wanted to produce sugar more quickly and cheaply. 64 There were a number of wider political and economic factors that worked to discourage sugar producers from diversifying into new chemical derivatives of sugar in the late colonial period. In April 1949 the Labour Party announced its intention to

in Science at the end of empire
Michael Woolcock, Simon Szreter and Vijayendra Rao

.historyandpolicy.org/papers/ policy-paper-54.html Sangari, Kumkum and Sudesh Vaid (eds) (1990). Recasting Women: Essays in Indian Colonial History, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press Sarkar, Sumit (1983). Popular Movements and Middle Class Leadership in Late Colonial India: Perspectives and Problems of a History from Below, Calcutta, KP Bagchi Schumpeter, Joseph A. (1975 [1942]). Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, New York: Harper Scott, James (1985). Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press Scott, James (1998). Seeing Like a State

in History, historians and development policy