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A sociology of the amateur

century with the expansion of piano-making as an activity (Ehrlich 1976) and the publication of sheetmusic (Peacock and Weir 1975). A pragmatic definition of the great amateur An amateur always participates in the production of the product he or she likes, as does the reader. In literary theory, or even earlier, the reader as described by Proust in the Foreword to Sésame et les Lys, the French version of Ruskin’s Sesame and the Lilies, is an actor of literature, made up of a set of positions ‘not outside of the book, but inside it’. Taste appears in the end as both a

in Qualities of food
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, and ‘illusion’, which clearly does have negative connotations. 8 T. W. Adorno, Ästhetische Theorie (Frankfurt: Suhrkamp, 1973), p. 429. 9 I shall not deal with the detail of Kant’s answer to this dilemma, which would take us too far beyond the scope of this essay. The view suggested here has been best outlined by Hilary Putnam. See also, A. Bowie, From Romanticism to Critical Theory: The Philosophy of German Literary Theory (London: Routledge, 1997). 10 Kant thinks the categories, the a priori forms of judgement, are the exception to this situation. Without the

in The new aestheticism

Readings Notes 1 G. Poulet, ‘Criticism and the experience of interiority’ in R. Macksey and E. Donato (eds), The Language of Criticism and the Science of Man (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1970), pp. 56–88 (p. 57). 2 Poulet, ‘Criticism and the experience of interiority’, p. 57. 3 H. Putnam, Reason, Truth and History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981), p. 126. 4 A. Bowie, From Romanticism to Critical Theory: The Philosophy of German Literary Theory (London: Routledge, 1997), p. 159. 5 Ibid. 6 J. M. Bernstein, The Fate of Art: Aesthetic

in The new aestheticism

In Kant: The Hermeneutical Import of the Critique of Judgement (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990); T. De Duve, Kant After Duchamp (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996). Works that highlight the interest of aesthetics in contemporary terms that are based on accounts other than Kant’s include A. Bowie, From Romanticism to Critical Theory: The Philosophy of German Literary Theory (London: Routledge, 1997) and I. Armstrong, The Radical Aesthetic (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000), the latter of which makes interesting use of the work of Gillian Rose. 2 The reflexive

in The new aestheticism
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Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, Eleanor Hull’s Commentary on the penitential Psalms, and Thomas Norton’s Ordinal of alchemy

to manipulate it nevertheless, as will be discussed here.  5 Published in Electronic literature collection, vol. 1 (2006), ed. N. Katherine Hayles et al. http://collection.eliterature.org. For discussions of system time and reading time, see Markku Eskelinen, Cybertext poetics: the critical landscape of new media literary theory (New York and London: Continuum, 2012), at 135–6.  6 Ibid., 136. Eskelinen’s work has shaped discourse on temporality in new media for years, and still reflects the pervasive influence of secondwave digital media criticism, which sought to

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
The structures of migration in Tales from Firozsha Baag

67 It is, in fact, possible to object to the violation involved in these intrusive parental meditations, in having Kersi’s parents disgorge chunks of semi-digested literary theory. The two figures reading these stories at home in Bombay appear to bear little relation to the carefully drawn characters in ‘Of White Hairs and Cricket’, for example. The voices in the last story do not ‘feel’ as if they belong to the same people. A certain amount of arbitrary grafting seems to have been involved to get the discussion underway. However, the tone makes sense if one reads

in Rohinton Mistry
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Soviet things that talk

historical attempt to create comradely socialist objects, instituted as a response to burgeoning Western consumer culture that was being used as a tool of soft power in the cultural Cold War.19 Methodologically, I combine the insights of new materialism and recent design histories with the theoretical framework of Soviet productivism. In addition, I engage with an idea from Russian avant-garde’s literary theory, the ‘biography of the object’, which Serguei Oushakine reads as one of the precursors to new materialist thinking.20 In his 1929 KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT

in Comradely objects
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The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes

Espin Aarseth, ‘Nonlinearity and literary theory’, in George Landow, ed., Hyper/text/theory (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994), 51–86, at 66. Aarseth’s work on ergodic literature, within which he includes nonlinear texts, continues to be influential in the field: also see Cybertext. 37 Such a treatment seems to anticipate the fate of hypertext fiction today, as the taxing effort required to read and assemble narrative has been one of the reasons attributed to the genre’s failure to gain wide readership. See, for example, Benjamin Paloff, ‘Digital

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis

. However, like so many of his contemporaries, he did not regard the boundaries between forms of theoretical and creative activity as fixed, and his philosophy is an integral part of a wider project which includes scientific and literary work. One of the main reasons why Novalis has become the focus of recent attention is that he asks questions about subjectivity which already involve issues relating to the ‘subversion of the subject’ which has become the theme of so much recent theoretical discussion. Claims in certain areas of contemporary European philosophy and literary

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Art and interpretation

contemporary literary theory, in which the boundaries between linguistic communities become uncrossable. One of the most productive aspects of Schleiermacher’s work is its rejection of naive versions of relativism and its insistence on truth and objectivity. At the same time, he gives full weight to the fact that the problems involved both in communication within languages and translation between them deeply affect the nature of the philosophical enterprise, rendering it inherently impossible to complete in the manner demanded by traditional metaphysics. Although he is

in Aesthetics and subjectivity