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The St Vincent and the Grenadines context
Philip Nanton

expel King JaJa of Opobo, the palm oil middle-man trader who threatened their West African palm oil trade. However, despite this colonial acceptance of St Vincent’s remoteness, Kingstown modernised slowly during the nineteenth century. And with this modernity, signs of frontier wilderness dissipated to some extent. Indications of this slowly growing modernity included the building of a local police

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Open Access (free)
Frontier patterns old and new
Philip Nanton

disturbed by their visit. And there is modernity. In 1966 V. S. Naipaul drew attention to Trinidad’s modernity. 2 These images of calm, serenity, playfulness and modernity struggle to crowd out the region’s other face of localised violence (increasingly gang-based and in run-down city locations) and disorder. In 2012 murder rates in Jamaica and tiny St Kitts and Nevis were among the ten highest in the world

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Andrew Bowie

to say. Do art and philosophy have the same purpose, or can they be separated? What does this mean for philosophy and for art in modernity? The contrasts between the Romantics, Schelling and Hegel will have paradigmatic significance for these issues. The essential thought behind the Romantic, as opposed to the Idealist, view of the post-Kantian situation was already present in the implications of Kant’s notion of the sublime. The sublime resulted from the inability of thought to represent the infinite in the sensuous. At the same time the experience of the sublime

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Catherine Baker

rarely synthesise as far as eastern Europe – despite evidence that they should (Novikova 2013 ). Yet ‘commodity racism’ (McClintock 1994 : 130), the mass production of racialised narratives/visualisations of modernity and primitivism around commodities extracted from colonised land, permeated as a transnational, implicitly ‘European’ mode of representation far beyond the largest metropoles into smaller northern European countries like Switzerland and Iceland (Loftsdóttir 2010 ; Purtschert and Fischer-Tiné (eds) 2015 ). Inner Austria, indeed, is

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Kant
Andrew Bowie

mirrors the ways in which the spheres of science and technology become separated from the sphere of law and morality in modernity. As the new forms of cognitive relationship to nature produce the ability to manipulate nature to an ever greater extent, nature comes to be seen in terms of regulation and classification, making it primarily into an object which the subject determines. Grounding decisions about what ought to be done with the limitless capacity of the understanding to generate new knowledge thus becomes an unavoidable problem because the understanding itself

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Philip Nanton

for looking towards modernity and ‘civilisation’, and the avoidance of the wild and wilderness. This unwillingness to look, however, does not mean that the wild has gone away. This work has suggested that, like those old perennials – taxation and death – the wild has remained very much with us in the Caribbean. This text has identified various kinds of ‘boundary troublers’ or ‘boundary

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Catherine Baker

, genocide. 1 Transnational feminist histories of race and empire meanwhile reveal the everyday, intimate politics of global racial formations, where racialised ideologies of gender, sexuality and bodies circulated between colonised territories and metropoles, indeed into any society that even aspired to the modernity of European civilisational superiority (McClintock 1995 ; Young 1995 ; Stoler 2002 ). ‘Race’ simultaneously structures new experiences of migration, informing states' classifications of who may cross borders or settle more freely or less so, and shaping

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Philip Nanton

, indentured and free labour, and raw-material exploitation since the fifteenth century European arrival. As a result, the Caribbean was probably the first (agriculturally) industrialised region of the globalised, capitalist western world, and through this incorporation combined colonialism with modernity. Over the long term it has undergone a gradual evolution in political systems, from various degrees of

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Catherine Baker

of Yugoslavia which, it is sometimes thought, opened space for new postsocialist racisms. Translations of broader racialised discourses in the 1990s indeed took distinctive forms, embedded in a transnational European ‘cultural racism’ (Balibar and Wallerstein 1991 : 26) consolidating nationalisms around a common defensive project of securing Europe against supposedly culturally alien, unassimilable migrant Others from Africa and Asia (Lentin 2004 ; Fekete 2009 ). Culturalist narratives of Europeanness-as-modernity and Europeanness-at-risk entered traditionalist

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Mads Qvortrup

possible candidate for a deconstruction of the interpretation that the arts and sciences had benefited mankind. Diderot did not – and could not – sympathise with Rousseau’s view, but saw the essay as good sport and a challenging game.8 For Rousseau it was anything but a game. Modernity was an evil, indeed, the evil, which had disenchanted the world. It is worth considering this aspect in some detail, as Rousseau’s discontent with modernity and secularism, perhaps more than anything else, was the cause that fired his passion. If there is a core to Rousseau’s oeuvre it

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau