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Elisa Narin van Court

we consider a cultural given.14 The Siege of Jerusalem offers many such discursive moments which invite audience and reader into active colloquy with the poem’s complex representation of Jews. MUP_McDonald_08_Ch7 153 11/20/03, 14:37 154 Elisa Narin van Court The nature of the poem’s anti-Judaism is again explored by Christine Chism who notes that the poem ‘never loses sight of the sufferings of the Jews’.15 Yet even as she notes the poem’s emphasis on suffering and sympathy, Chism argues for the poet’s ‘delight in cruel inversion’ in which pity and sympathy

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
Jane Gilbert

by Lacan’s description of the paternal function as the imposition of order on the chaos of nature (by this means the father symbolises the differential structure of the Law). Whereas Aristotle’s focus is on the insufficiencies of the mother, however, Lacan’s is on those of the father; moreover, Aristotle grounds his discussions of paternity and maternity in biology (thus providing them with the ideological camouflage afforded by an association with ‘nature’), while Lacan emphasises the political dimensions of both. Lacan’s writings of the early and mid 1950s, in

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

self-interest, digital media can offer much to those studying media studies, literary culture, and book history in the late Middle Ages. In digital media, participation relates to interaction, which together have been used to emphasize the ground-breaking nature of the digital, initially perceived as setting ‘new’ media aside from ‘old’ media. While that divisive view has since diminished in the current approaches of digital media studies, which recognize greater continuity among historical forms of media, the attention given to participation still proves beneficial

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
A queer history
Peter Buchanan

The novel Beowulf , an account of a London tearoom during the Blitz, occupies a curious and somewhat embarrassing place in early medieval literary studies. The first notice that early medievalists took of it is a brief entry in Donald Fry's bibliography of the Old English poem: ‘Bryher, Winifred. Beowulf : A Novel. NY, 1956. No relation to the poem.’  2 This entry poses several interesting questions about the nature of bibliographic inquiry because it explicitly distances itself from the

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’
Heather Blatt

extended further still if referring to ink written Reading materially 109 evocatively with the highly acid ink made from oak galls, bitter and biting in its nature. Such distinctions between forensic and formal materiality can also be represented in the literary imaginary. For Henryson’s abbey wall, the forensic materiality would be that of stone, whereas the formal emerges in the relation between the materiality of the text and the apprehension of the narrator-reader as discussed above. Similarly interested in what Kirshenbaum would term the forensic materialities of

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Nonreading in late-medieval England
Heather Blatt

books. Considering ‘nonreading’ is to examine not only reading, but how books were handled (in which something is done to the book) and circulated (in which something is done to other persons by means of the book).4 Price’s concept of nonreading adds another angle to studying the history of the book and reading. The concept of nonreading also invites analysis that attends to the arguments of object-oriented ontology and new materialisms. As studying nonreading involves attending to the material nature of books, moments of nonreading demonstrate how the book as matter

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

(see Figure 1.9 and Figure 3.7 ). Overall, this pattern implies that the configuration B burials were treated differently. Instead of the vertical pattern presented in the centre of the cemetery among the configuration A burials, the configuration B inhumations had a more horizontal nature and were at least partially buried among groups of contemporaneous graves. However, there were a couple of graves which complicate this. Grave 12 was of the A configuration, and was interesting because it consisted of two burials: 12A was a male burial with a scabbard mount

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Open Access (free)
Beowulf translations by Seamus Heaney and Thomas Meyer
David Hadbawnik

do carry over, as in ‘mourning’ / ‘month’, which at least offers a trace of the original's alliteration. Given the constructed nature of modern critical editions of Beowulf based on the sole surviving manuscript, there is ample justification for Meyer's arrangement; in fact, many early print editions of Old English texts presented half-lines in a similar way. There are two intimacies, I argue, driving this arrangement of text. The first, as already explored above, is Meyer's affinity for the sparse, fragmented, modernist style introduced by

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes
Heather Blatt

Catherine of Siena’s Dialogue concerning divine providence dialogue as both cultivated and organic in nature: in other words, blending divine creation through the filter of humanity. This metaphor, of course, evokes the conventional medieval understanding of nature as reflecting divine teachings, and humanity’s role as engaging with nature in order to learn moral and theological lessons.11 The orchard metaphor, in its reliance upon a cultivated place, encourages readers to think about nature in subordination to both the will of God and the will of humans. Yet this

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Emotional connections to the young hero in Beowulf
Mary Dockray-Miller

Beowulf as their lord and ring-giver: Wiglaf says that Beowulf ‘us ðas beagas geaf’ (gave to us these rings) (2635b) and he ‘usic garwigend gode tealde’ (thought us good spear-warriors) (2641). Only Wiglaf, of course, turns and enters the battle; the rest run away. When he addresses Beowulf directly, Wiglaf calls him ‘Leofa Biowulf’ (beloved Beowulf) (2663a). Beowulf responds with the same terminology, addressing him as ‘Wiglaf leofa’ (beloved Wiglaf) (2745a) after the dragon is dead; the verbal echoes here reinforce the emotional nature of the bond between the warrior

in Dating Beowulf