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Jane Brooks

nurses had the chance to support the development of the profession in the post-­war British hospital system. The reason for the limited acknowledgement of these new and important nursing methods in hospitals has previously been levelled at the profession itself. The demobbed nurses could not or would not re-­engage with such a rigid system. The nurses’ testimonies used in this book suggest a more complex depiction of post-­war opportunities. Hospitals did not encourage living out and, despite government claims that opportunities for independent living should be

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Cultural and political change in 1960s Britain
Steven Fielding

. There is, in fact, a school of thought that is its exact opposite, one that presents post-war Britain as defined by repression and tired conformity. Advocates of this view see change as heralding a much-needed liberation for hitherto excluded groups, such as the young, women, workers and ethnic minorities. According to them, instead of loss, the 1960s brought considerable gains and on that basis should be celebrated rather than mourned.14 Rather than seeing the period in zero-sum terms, others focus on how Britain after 1945 engaged with ‘modernity’. Within this frame

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Dietary advice and agency in North America and Britain
Nicos Kefalas

Ibid. 94 D. Bell and J. Hollows, ‘Towards a history of lifestyle’, in Bell and Hollows (eds), Historicizing Lifestyle , p. 4; Giddens, Modernity and Self-Identity , p. 3. 95 J. Kirby, ‘Working too hard: experiences of worry and stress in post-war Britain’, in M. Jackson (ed.), Stress in Post-War

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

argued that state involvement in the well-being of the next generation was essential if democracy, with its checks and balances, could be secured against the extremes of totalitarianism. 58 Similarly, Martin Francis has outlined the limits of emotional economy in post-war British political life. 59 The performance of emotional balance, self-restraint and rationality was particularly important in the Labour Party during the early post-war years, given political and

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1950). 17 Martin D. Moore, Managing Diabetes, Managing Medicine: Chronic Disease and Clinical Bureaucracy in Post-War Britain (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2019). 18 Virginia Berridge, Marketing Health (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). 19 Porter, Health Citizenship ; Huisman and Oosterhuis, ‘The politics of health and citizenship’. 20 See, for example, the history of health and safety and changing notions of “risk” for

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

logical place to begin a review of modern education in Britain has to be the passage of the 1944 Education Act. This should be seen as part of the process of re-building post-war Britain, a task which was the subject of much agreement between the political parties. It was sponsored by R.A. Butler (and is sometimes known as the ‘Butler Act’), the Conservative Education minister in the all-party coalition of the day. The principles and intentions of the Act were as follows: 54 Understanding British and European political issues 1 The ‘Board of Education’ (of which

in Understanding British and European political issues
The Spanish Gardener and its analogues
Alison Platt

and not life itself as he does in the story, but his oddly blank expression as he descends the staircase to greet his parents seems to register the change he has undergone: it is a look which has put aside childish things. This brings me back to The Sixth Sense and Magnolia , to that child who started life in post-war British films. Raymond Durgnat has chronicled the era

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

State: A History of Public Health from Ancient to Modern Times (London: Routledge, 1999). 5 Roberta Bivins, ‘ “The people have no more love left for the Commonwealth”: Media, migration and identity in the 1961–62 British smallpox outbreak’, Immigrants & Minorities , 25:3 (2007), 263–89; Roberta Bivins, Contagious Communities: Medicine, Migration, and the NHS in Post-War Britain (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015). 6 Bivins, ‘ “The people have no more love left” ’ and Bivins, Contagious Communities

in Vaccinating Britain
Martin D. Moore

M. D. Moore, ‘Reorganising chronic disease management: diabetes and bureaucratic technologies in post-war British general practice’, in M. Jackson (ed.), The Routledge History of Disease (London: Routledge, 2017), p. 460. 3 R. D. Hill, ‘Community care service for diabetics in the Poole area’, BMJ , 1:6018 (1976), 1139. 4 Such as asthma or ‘chronic rheumatism’: J. Fry, Common Diseases: Their Nature, Incidence and Care , 2nd edition (Lancaster: MTP Press Limited, 1979), pp. 22–4. 5 See

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Martin D. Moore

the public sat at the heart of many scandals, and the issue greatly concerned bodies claiming to speak for patient-consumers. The emergence of these organisations during the 1960s coincided with the broader professionalisation of collective consumer voices in post-war Britain and their institutionalisation within state bodies. 11 Moreover, groups like the Patients’ Association built upon contemporaneous public demands for autonomy and political accountability. Recent research on the 1970s and 1980s, for instance, has traced the migration of accountability practices

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine