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Gary Banham

morals is to carry conviction it is essential that Kant should demonstrate that there are pure feelings. Given that the moral law acts as a counter to the demands of sensuousness the first feeling that it produces in us is humiliation. But humiliation has also a positive correlate in the form of respect for the moral law, a feeling ‘produced by an intellectual cause, and this feeling is the only one which we can know completely a priori and the necessity of which we can discern’.6 Further, respect is not a ‘drive’ to morality but rather ‘morality itself, regarded

in The new aestheticism
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Janet Beer and Bridget Bennett

dynamic of the friendship between Alfred North Whitehead and Gertrude Stein. For Stein, writing as Alice B. Toklas and with characteristic modesty, named Whitehead – along with herself and Pablo Picasso – as one of the three geniuses she knew. Despite the disparities in the writing styles and intellectual backgrounds of Stein and Whitehead, their mutual admiration and respect was augmented by their ‘shared conception of process of movement, as the universal feature of all that exists’. Edith Wharton and Virginia Woolf as ‘the two most articulate and influential literary

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

the more insightful of these critiques have in fact had the reverse effect of reconfirming the liberatory potential of selfdefining and/or nationalist discourses with respect to women’s lives, even if this potential has to date rarely been fully realised. The nation, it is important to bear in mind, remains a place from which to resist the multiple ways in which colonialism distorts and disfigures a people’s history. The narrative of a nation imposes a meaningful chronology and continuity upon the anarchic flux which the coloniser ascribes to the native’s past. This is

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

shops, governesses and servants by the British press and people. If there had to be war, it must be fought without passion or bitterness but with respect for the ‘enemy’; he wanted Great Britain to triumph on the sea and Germany on land and then both to keep the peace thereafter. This was Keeling emoting, as he inferred, on a practical level, as a ‘political animal’. On a deeper level he expressed more passion; ‘As a man’, he wrote on 2 August, ‘I detest the conception of one national culture regarding itself as essentially the enemy of another’.14 198 A war of

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
The male leader’s autobiography and the syntax of postcolonial nationalism
Elleke Boehmer

view Gandhi as an embodiment of India. These images will be briefly compared with the nationalist ideas of Sarojini Naidu, the eminent Indian nationalist, poet and close colleague of both Nehru and Gandhi. Despite her interest in representing Indian women’s interests, and despite Nehru’s ‘advanced’ attitudes with respect to women, my suggestion will be that the progressive commitments of both were constrained by their traditional if nationalist ideas of the Indian woman.18 The section following the discussion of Nehru comprises a collage of diagnostic observations on

in Stories of women
Howard Caygill

‘fleshpots’ of biblical Egypt with the temptations of Philo’s contemporary Alexandria. Yet even here there are the beginnings of a characteristic ambivalence with respect to the city – does it represent only the Egyptian ‘house of bondage’, or is it, as for Dionysos of Alexandria, the Sinai desert or even the promised land? To complicate matters further, Philo carries over the biblical metaphor or ‘Exodus pattern’ into the aesthetic through the parallels between the biblical and the philosophical Exodus, from the pleasures of the senses to reason, and the philological

in The new aestheticism
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Gill Rye and Michael Worton

cost of the death of the Author’),12 and to Michel Foucault’s response in his  lecture, ‘Qu’est-ce qu’un auteur?’ (‘What is an Introduction  author?’), which examined the institutional mechanisms employed by a society to give authority to a discourse and thereby itself to ‘author’ it.13 The writer had previously occupied a privileged position as a respected and legitimate commentator, even if he or she was regarded as contestatory or subversive, as with Sartre and Beauvoir. However, after , the writer began to be seen as marginal. The irony of Barthes

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality
Kate Rigby

Network Leadership Council (2013), which has produced an ‘Action Agenda for Sustainable Development’ that broadly accords with the ‘nested’ approach. For example, while economic development and ending extreme poverty remain key priorities, these are now to be achieved in ways that respect ‘planetary boundaries’ by ensuring environmentally sustainable production and consumption patterns and helping to stabilise the human population globally by mid-century. Improvements to agricultural systems, rural prosperity and urban quality of life are also to be keyed to enhanced

in Literature and sustainability
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Different voices, voicing difference
Gilli Bush-Bailey

secondly as a straight actress’ (Constanduros, 1946: 64). Variety theatres, for all that had been done to expel the rackety inheritance of the nineteenth-century music halls and transform them into respectable places of popular entertainment, were simply outside the frame of the ‘legitimate’ stage profession that Constanduros envisaged for herself. As a broadcast performer at pains to express her liking and respect for her variety colleagues and their ‘extreme competence’, nonetheless Constanduros still saw her working world as separate and superior to theirs. Her

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Andrew Bowie

something else. The emergence of the orientation in cultural studies towards ‘popular culture’ of all kinds is in this respect a logical response to the suspicion that works from the great traditions may now no longer (if, of course, they ever did) have a decisive influence on political and social life. This does not, however, obviate aesthetic questions, even in relation to popular culture. The danger here is that an apparent openness to what supposedly (and sometimes actually) elitist positions have unjustifiably ignored can in fact be based on another kind of failure

in The new aestheticism