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Cinema, news media and perception management of the Gaza conflicts

it terrorist ’. 32 The emphasis on Hamas, not Israel, as a terror organisation that causes suffering to civilians also enables a shift of responsibility for the killing, as can be seen in an account given by an Israeli history student, Sophie Tal, featured on the BBC website, in which the killing of Palestinian civilians is justified as a response to terrorism

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Journalism practice, risk and humanitarian communication

entering the continent and the links that public discourses established between them and issues such as terrorism and rape – widely exploited by right-wing populist politicians and media – have created a climate of fear. Indeed, a major Ipsos MORI survey across twenty-two countries worldwide provides an insight into attitudes to immigration and the refugee crisis. This study highlights that six in ten people across these countries

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Managing the criminal facets of war economies

: ‘my government let me stay for two years and then they said they wanted me home and I said I can’t because I’m in the middle of a terrorism trial, I want to finish it, and they said, fine, but you’re going to have to give up your job [back home], so I had to quit’ (I48). The impact of forced or voluntary short-term commitments is threefold. First is the problem of recruitment. It is already difficult to get qualified judges and lawyers to leave their homes, families and jobs to come to a conflictaffected zone. Such difficulties are made worse by expecting

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
Protecting borders, confirming statehood and transforming economies?

global governance missionaries’ (Hozic, 2006: 244). Customs is also seen as a way of preventing the spread of organised crime to Western Europe (Bruggman, 2001) and is further seen as another check against the threat of terrorism in the post-9/11 world (Chaflin, 2006; Heyman, 2004; Megoran, Raballand and Bouyjou, 2005; Walsh, 2006). However, customs assistance has not always had the desired effect and besides not bringing the expected economic benefits (Bartlett and Samardzˇija, 2000), the agenda of installing a modern customs agency based on neo-liberal economic

in Building a peace economy?

cooperation and integration, environment, drugs, terrorism, consultation on global issues, and cooperation projects. The Declaration of Rome was not a surprise; the conference in Rome had been called in order to institutionalize this forum (Ayuso 1996). It could be argued little improvement in the relations resulted, apart from discussions and promises to cooperate, which tended to remain unrealized. The role of the EU–Rio Group relations is better understood from the point of view of the EU’s interests in the region. Given the low level of EU interest in Latin America, the

in The European Union's policy towards Mercosur:

issue the Parties should consider appropriate to discuss in their Political Dialogue: Particularly, on the grounds of peace and stability, prevention of conflicts, confidence and security building measures, promotion and protection of Human Rights, democracy and the Rule of law, sustainable development taking into account economic, social and environmental dimensions, common action against drug trafficking and related felonies, arms trafficking, organized crime and international terrorism. (EU–Mercosur 2000a) This statement makes it clear that Mercosur felt that the

in The European Union's policy towards Mercosur:
Open Access (free)
The management of migration between care and control

towards the Mediterranean, which arises from the EU’s construction of the region based on geopolitical considerations and threat perceptions. 13 As Cebeci and Schumacher argue, securitisation refers to the state of exception where everything else is subordinated to the logic of security, commonly expressed through the rhetoric of the threat of terrorism, illegal immigration, energy disruption, the rise

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

. 114 Peter Hart, The IRA at War, 1916–1923 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003), 34–37. 115 Daly, First Department , 78. 116 Peter Hart, The IRA and its Enemies: Violence and Community in Cork, 1916–1923 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), 81–82. 117 The Burning of Irish Creameries’, Manchester Guardian , 30 October 1920, 11. 118 ‘Terrorism in Kerry’, The Kerryman , 30 October 1920. 119 C.C. Riddall to R.A. Anderson, Dublin, 6 October

in Civilising rural Ireland