Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

increasing, along with deliberate targeting of humanitarian workers, operations and inventory used to help people trapped in conflict ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2017 ; Stoddard et al. , 2018 ). Amplifying this instability has been the slow progress towards changing the vulnerability of people living in many countries. Notwithstanding advances made in Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets, an estimated 736 million people remained in extreme poverty

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada and Róisín Read

the same conclusions in a series of studies on humanitarian space ( Collinson and Elhawary, 2012 ) and humanitarian negotiations, particularly in Afghanistan, Sudan and Somalia ( Jackson, 2014 ; Jackson and Giustozzi, 2012 ). In 2014, Larissa Fast published Aid in Danger ( Fast, 2014 ), a timely book reminding humanitarian organisations of their responsibility to work on internal vulnerabilities, such as individual behaviour or organisational lapses. Fast’s main intention was to challenge what she

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

the poor who suffer the worst. Whether it is in a typhoon-prone or earthquake-prone area, look where the rich people live and look where the poorer people live and see who lives in the most vulnerable areas and the most vulnerable buildings. The British Medical Journal banned the word ‘accident’, as most injuries and their precipitating events are both predictable and preventable. So too are disasters, and ‘natural’ can usefully be discarded as an accompanying epithet

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Emmanuelle Strub

by armed men on the main roads made regular aid delivery to the IDP (internally displaced person) camps difficult. Was armed protection necessary to ensure access to vulnerable populations? Five years later, in 1997, three MdM-Spain volunteers were killed and a fourth wounded in a targeted attack in Ruhengeri, Northern Rwanda. In Chechnya and the former Yugoslavia, NGO personnel were being kidnapped or targeted. Those incidents made security a tangible issue for MdM

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

Sphere Handbook is a key reference point and identifies minimum standards for the field. It reinforces the importance of communicating ‘in languages, formats and media that are easily understood, respectful and culturally appropriate for different members of the community, especially vulnerable or marginalized groups’ ( Sphere Association, 2018 : 63). Providing ‘interpreters and translators if needed’ is also identified as a key action for sharing information with

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Paul Currion

sector sometimes seem to bear down on each new innovation lab. To some extent, this is a problem that we have created for ourselves; the same tide of optimism that previously lifted us up is now receding, and we risk being beached. The limitations of innovation are now clear. Innovation ‘looked at as a process, appears suspiciously like the reforms of yesteryear’ ( Sandvik, 2014 : 27), potentially exposes vulnerable communities to new types of risk, and risks marginalising local aid workers and disaster

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

Somalia workshop, for example, commented on the cathartic nature of discussing the events of the 1990s and early 2000s. Yet there are very specific consequences, including heightened emotional vulnerability, associated with recalling sensitive experiences with which participants are familiar ( Ellis, 2007 ) and in the dynamics of a group setting ( Christensen, 2016 ). The reflective process must be carefully managed to safeguard the well-being of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

disinformation. But they have not yet closely examined their impact in humanitarian crises. This is a remarkable oversight. In humanitarian crises, false information can have life-and-death consequences. As Jeanne Bourgault, President and Chief Executive Officer of Internews, states, false information can ‘undercut efforts to improve health, make disasters worse than they already are, alienate vulnerable populations, and even incite violence’ (quoted in Igoe, 2017 ). This article introduces the emerging research about online disinformation and the many forms it

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

former can be broken down into a number of non-exclusive categories: demographic (women and children, children under five or, more rarely, the elderly), social (a discriminated-against minority, a disadvantaged stratum of society or a so-called ‘vulnerable’ group), medical (injured people who can be successfully operated on or patients with a specific condition such as trachoma, AIDS, malnutrition, etc.), organisational (safe drinking water, food, shelter, education

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

world politics, we know that these principles are mainly honoured in the breach. Most vulnerable is the idea that liberal space is somehow apolitical. To take an obvious example, no self-respecting liberal state could pass a law that required its citizens to practise the same religion or to curb their freedom to dissent against the government. Private freedoms are beyond the reach of public policy (with obvious complexities, e.g. around hate speech and blasphemy). The problem here is simply put. In the words of Brian Barry (1990 : 8): If the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs