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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples

Regulations and Statement, 1. Freda Hawkins, Critical Years in Immigration: Canada and Australia Compared (Kingston and Montreal: McGill–Queen’s University Press, 1989), 39. 8 Ibid ., 7. 9 Ibid ., 6

in Female imperialism and national identity
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in Spiers (ed.), Sudan , pp. 223–8. 23 H. Cecil, ‘British Correspondents and the Sudan Campaign of 1896–98’, in Spiers (ed.), Sudan , pp. 102–27; S. Badsey, ‘The Boer War as a Media War’, in P. Dennis and J. Grey (eds), The Boer War: Army, Nation and Empire. The 1999 Chief of Army/Australian

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
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’. 89 Naipaul, The Middle Passage , p. 29. 90 Rachael Kohn, ‘India through V. S. Naipaul’s eyes’, The Spirit of Things , Radio National (Australia), 9 September 2001. 91 Homi Bhabha, ‘Naipaul’s vernacular

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Organizing principles, 1900–1919

. 14 Freda Hawkins, Critical Years in Immigration: Canada and Australia Compared (Montreal and Kingston: McGill–Queen’s University Press, 1989 ), 17. This important clause was to be active for fifty years. 15 Marilyn Barber, ‘Introduction’ to 2nd edn of Woodsworth, Strangers at Our Gates , xiv

in Female imperialism and national identity

crushing had squeezed out the sugar-containing cane juice. Traditionally this waste product was used as a fuel in the estate factories for boiling sugar cane juice. The product that seemed to have the greatest commercial potential was sugar cane wax. Sugar cane wax could be used as a polish and was able to compete with carnauba wax in terms of price. The first commercial factory producing wax from cane had been established in Durban, South Africa, in 1916, and a factory making wax also operated in Australia. Interest in the development of sugar cane wax had been high in

in Science at the end of empire
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‘A vote the same as any other person’

instincts or British feelings or aspirations, and therefore ought not to have a vote . . . I used the word Chinaman to designate a race . . . The Australians exclude the Chinese from Hong Kong as well as other Chinese.’ 43 In such an environment Simon Dawson’s attempts to contest the general definition of ‘Indian’ as barbarian fell upon deaf ears. 44 Those who spoke in favour of

in Equal subjects, unequal rights

forehead, the aquiline nose, the well-cut lip.’ Some of the ‘hill or jungle tribes’, however, possess characteristics ‘which one is accustomed to look for only in Africa – frizzled hair, thick lips, and flattened nose…. Others are similar as to nose and lips, but have coarse, dark hair, not unlike the aborigines of Australia.’ 100 In rather more interesting ways, Hull outlined the promise of Western

in The other empire
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begun under Roberts and continued under Kitchener. 84 Soldiers had mixed feelings about these tasks: some, like Captain Boyd A. Cunningham (4/Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Militia), regarded ‘orders to ravage some farms . . . [as] great fun’; 85 others regretted the destruction of livestock or emphasised that they only burnt farms from which they had been fired upon. Whereas an Australian officer

in The Victorian soldier in Africa