. Renting the room enabled her to rest and focus on her studies rather than spend all her time and energy organizing political actions, getting evicted, and moving. Although Maria appreciated the stability of living in a rental house, she preferred a squatters living group and “to squat out of principle.” Maria envisioned living in social housing as a choice for a twenty-eight year old, which she clearly deemed as the age for adulthood. To explain why she planned to continue squatting, Maria listed what she

in The autonomous life?
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Transgressing the cordon sanitaire: understanding the English Defence League as a social movement

’, not ‘they’, are prioritised (Rhodes, 2009). Transforming emotion into action: social movements and the ‘far right’ This book proposes to understand the EDL through the prism of social movement studies. This is not without its challenges since empirical studies in this field tend to focus on progressive (and largely peaceful) forms of protest and evade engagement with more difficult far right and religious fundamentalist groups (Della Porta, 2008: 223) or ‘distasteful’ movements (Esseveld and Eyerman, 1992: 218). But it is not without precedent. Klandermans and

in Loud and proud

circular saw wheels that cut through metal), and the high possibility of police violence, the squatting action required the presence of an unusually immense group of people to protect the people breaking open the door and to dissuade the police from interfering since the majority of the apartments had been empty for less than a year (rather than for a year or longer, per standard practice). With over one hundred people present, the action succeeded smoothly and without delays. Four breakers with handheld motor flexes cut

in The autonomous life?
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Piercing the politics of silencing

complains that, in his experience, the response to any success by the far right (citing past electoral successes of the NF and BNP) is that they ‘mix the wards up’ to prevent it happening again. In a shocking statement, Andrew blames the actions of Anders Breivik in Norway on precisely what he calls a ‘silencing of the right’: … people weren’t ready to listen, because the right were silenced, if anyone spoke out about immigration or about these rape issues or these crime issues, these leftwing people, these so called innocent people who got killed, they would silence them

in Loud and proud
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Emotion, affect and the meaning of activism

that the rational and the emotional may be entwined in social movement participation rather than constituting alternative explanations of motivation to engage (Crossley, 2002: 50). Indeed, Jasper (1998: 398) argues many aspects of collective action in social movements that have been viewed as primarily cognitive in fact have emotional dimensions to them. This chapter starts with a brief discussion of theoretical debates on emotion and affect in relation to social movements and adopts the notion of ‘affective practice’ (Wetherell, 2012: 4) as a means of understanding

in Loud and proud
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completing a taught masters programme at Loughborough University, asked Tess Kay to supervise his dissertation study of peer leaders’ use of sport to deliver HIV/AIDS education in Lusaka. Davies had strong personal links with the Zambian founders of the Education through Sport (EduSport) Foundation and Sport In Action, the two local and indigenous NGOs that would be involved in his study, but little research background; Tess had substantial

in Localizing global sport for development
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, 2012 ), the existence of further examination and discussion of Armstrong’s actions indicates that the simple explanation that athletes’ decisions to use banned technologies are based purely on enhancing performance is insufficient for understanding the use of technology in sport. Lance Armstrong’s case also concerned the immense amount of money that he obtained through sponsorship and other commercial arrangements, with fans raising questions about the continuation of those arrangements once his doping history

in Sport and technology

therefore illustrates how examining the network reveals the power relations within it, often through the production or prevention of action. The ANT perspective conceives of power as an action or effect that occurs through interactions within the network (Latour, 1996 ; Law, 1992 ; Matthewman, 2011 ). Through understanding power as an effect, ANT shows how both humans and non-humans can equally cause action but also, more importantly, that action occurs through humans and non-humans working together. For

in Sport and technology
Discourses, contestation and alternative consumption

fragmentation and complexity of everyday life, and through this they become reflexive (i.e. calculating) risk managers who choose different identities and lifestyles (Giddens 1991; Beck 1992). ‘Reflexivity’, though, has another meaning when it is applied to explanations, very much in line with its use in the ethnomethodological tradition. Harold Garfinkel (1985: 55) famously argued for the ‘reflexive’ or ‘embodied’ character of accounts, emphasising that ‘the procedures used by members to make accountable’ actions and situations are ‘identical’ to the activities through which

in Qualities of food
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The oddity of democracy

as customers, in which relation only buying or not buying of favoured and desired or uncongenial and unwanted human goods occurs, though even there it does not take the economic analogy further and see the demos not only as a customer but as an employer. Shaw's metaphor covers not only the commercial, self-contained, and completed action of buying a ticket, but the sustained and open-ended action of cheering, booing, and throwing rotten tomatoes. If people's identity goes no further than being customers, only money talks; if they are an audience of citizens, the

in Cultivating political and public identity