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the ‘retreat of the state’ (Strange, 1996), the ‘hollowing out of the state’ (Cerny, 1996: 91) and the rise of the ‘competition state’ (Cerny, 1990). The transformations from a perceived old to a new epoch are characterised in terms of shifts: from ‘comparative’ to ‘competitive’ advantage (Porter, 1990); from the ‘decommodifying’ to the ‘commodifying’ state (Cerny, 1990); and from ‘industrial’ to ‘post-industrial’ society (Hepworth, 1989; Block, 1990). While commentators do not agree on the normative aspects of such transformations (some celebrate the process, while

in Globalisation contested

of conflict and competition among contending groups that have underpinned the widespread acceptance of the democratic rules of the game. Finally, states themselves are deeply involved in the globalization process. State actors, in seeking to placate those domestic constituencies that can eject governments in democratically organized elections, are finding that sources of side-payments can only be expanded (or their shrinkage avoided) by promoting international competitiveness. Policy instruments are dismantled and disarmed, strategic competences broken up through

in Democratization through the looking-glass
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particular technologies or not to dope because of their desire for purity, to keep their bodies and sport clean and untainted. For example, US 5000m athletics champion Lauren Fleshman publicly criticised Lance Armstrong on the grounds that he undermined fair play, which she believed defined sporting practice (see Fleshman, 2013 ). Fleshman’s stance assumes an amateur ethos that places fair play ahead of winning, and harks back to a romanticised view of sport as historically free from overly competitive practices

in Sport and technology
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regulation at EU level threatens to undermine these political objectives. Without more co-ordinated action in the field of sport, EU policy towards sport risks being pulled apart by competing policy tensions. Traditionally, the sports sector has developed rules which have attempted to maintain a competitive balance between participants. Given the extent of commercialisation in European sport, the maintenance of these rules is considered by many as essential. However, many of these alleged pro-competitive rules have been regarded as anti-competitive by the EU. Again, the

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Credibility, dirigisme and globalisation

markets. This chapter charts how the credibility built after the 1983 U-turn through firstly competitive disinflation and subsequently the ‘ordoliberal’1 foundations of EMU generated policy space exploited by the Jospin Government. It then assesses enduring volontarisme in French Socialist economic and social policy-making, analysing the employment and redistribution oriented economic policies central to the 1997–2002 period. Finally, it explores successful attempts at institutional re-engineering of the EMU architecture, notably expanding scope for dirigiste fiscal

in In search of social democracy
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Quality and processes of qualification

quality’ becomes a historical and comparative matter – one of ‘when and in what circumstances?’. One might argue that there are now rather more agencies involved in the process of qualification than in the past. More departments of state take an interest in the various attributes of food system – nutrition, safety, economic competitiveness, national interest. The EC presents an additional level of regulatory activity: new agencies, like the FSA in the UK, have come into being, taxed with an impartial advisory role and speaking especially as the voice of consumers who

in Qualities of food
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On the possibility of sustainability and democracy in advanced industrial nations

2579Ch8 12/8/03 11:57 AM Page 201 8 Straddling the fence: on the possibility of sustainability and democracy in advanced industrial nations At the heart of this study of Sweden and its efforts to create structures and processes for ecologically rational governance has been the political dilemma posed by sustainable development. Taking as my point of departure the normative question of ‘How are we to govern ourselves so as to value democracy and individual autonomy and still retain the integrity of the commons?’ and by measuring the empirical evidence of

in Sweden and ecological governance
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The potential and limits of EU development cooperation policy

reflected in income-based statistics alone (CEC, 2001). We have two main reservations. Firstly, it remains unclear how this primary focus on poverty reduction as an end can be squared with the increased emphasis on political conditionalities evident in the Cotonou Agreement. Secondly, it is also uncertain how a pro-poor focus can be compatible with the desire to facilitate global economic competitiveness in less poor economies for which preferential trade margins will no longer exist. These are matters for further research. Our aim throughout has been to assess the record

in EU development cooperation
The restructuring of work in Britain

‘flexible’ labour? This conundrum has been discussed at the heart of the globalisation debate, with those who see globalisation as a process proclaiming the convergence of national Amoore_Global_04_Ch3 67 6/19/02, 12:17 PM Globalisation contested 68 capitalisms around a neo-liberal policy agenda (Strange, 1997b), and those who see a nationally defined ‘project’ declaring globalisation to be a ‘myth’ (Weiss, 1998). Neither perspective, however, actually problematises the dichotomous representation of a globalisation ‘outside’ and a national capitalism ‘inside’. As is

in Globalisation contested
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Which technologies are improved, and how?

that are much faster than all the other designs. Hence, there have been certain approaches (such as active suspension systems or turbo charging) that have been killed off, either in their infancy or at some later stage, through the regulative processes surrounding motor sport. (Pinch and Henry, 1999 , p. 668) This statement reveals how the teams are aware of the importance of retaining a close competitive race in order for their sport to continue to be viable and

in Sport and technology