nightmare in which cultural prohibitions MUP_McDonald_07_Ch6 124 11/18/03, 17:02 Richard Coeur de Lion 125 are played out against fantasies of race, sex and imperialism. We don’t eat people, they do: medieval mappaemundi, like John Mandeville, conveniently locate the man-eater on the margins of the known world; responsibility for the gruesome tales of anthropophagy that, inevitably, surface nearer home is levelled at those already beyond the pale, Jews and other outcasts.4 Yet for all of its determination to purge itself of blame, and squeamishness aside, Western

in Pulp fictions of medieval England

comforting fantasy, nothing more. Some people are blissfully oblivious of this fact, as Steedman points out: an ignorance that goes along with privilege. Although invited to the party – interpellated as a middle-class liberal subject – she is aware that this is not all she is, or maybe even not who she is. We can assume that she goes along with it all, chatting to the woman she meets. But all the while she ‘quite deliberately’ maintains a distance, one visible only to herself, but one that enables her to preserve the complicated, incoherent person she recognises herself to

in Change and the politics of certainty
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expelling dangerous substances (excrements) out of the self and into the mother. (Klein, 1988b: 44) There are surely other ways of reading the examples I have just given; my use of the theory is an attempt to demonstrate something about internal experience. In this example, I feel that Klein’s description of the Keller_02_ch1pm 10 23/9/02, 10:48 am 11 Preliminaries and Proust fantasies of rage, and its enactment in the robbing and soiling of the mother, are related in some way to the internal experience of the narrative-self as manifested in the text. The narrative

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
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122 Fragmenting modernism provided helped him to construct his picture of this time? We will see. What is certain is that the ‘impossible things of the past which assuredly would never come again’ in Ford’s conception of reality in 1915 do, in his fantasies – his positive fictions – and that the ‘polished armour, shining swords, fortresses, conflagrations’ and impressive women (all common Pre-Raphaelite props) are joined by mental forays that produce magnificent archetypes and felt reminiscences that invigorate his prose.14 Ford dedicates Ancient Lights in the

in Fragmenting modernism
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Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard

(the treasure cave and exit). McClintock reads this as an allegory of the ‘genesis of racial and sexual order’ (p. 241), in which the heroes travel across a hostile and temporarily castrating female body to the mineral wealth of the mines and once there perform ‘an extraordinary fantasy of male birthing, culminating in the regeneration of white manhood’ (p. 248). One would never know from McClintock’s account that Haggard constructs this feminised landscape as beautiful and on occasion sublime.6 And that instead of unremitting hostility, the land offers the

in Postcolonial contraventions
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Self-entrapment in Waiting for Godot

sessions as being ‘at night’, when they actually took place in the early afternoon. Analysis of this led to memory/ fantasies of being locked into a room for hours by a mother who would not heed his cries for contact. I pointed out his re-creation of this internal scene within our space, and how he experienced me in this way, as silent and uncaring. After speaking of his terrible sense of loneliness, he correctly guessed our time was up, saying he was glad to leave as he was about to cry. I said he feared his cries would be unheard, and for the first time in our

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love

the field of childhood psychosis and autism research in Britain. They formed the basis of the ‘second’ autism, the autism that depicted absence of imaginative thinking and fantasy. This new ‘style of reasoning’ about autism was formulated as a direct response to government pressures and demands for numerical and statistical knowledge about the child population

in The metamorphosis of autism
Gender, sexual difference and knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis

, shewing that nation to be compounded of all goodness’ (472). This self-proclaimed naturalism reminds us that the binary opposition between culture and nature has earlier been transgressed, and then proleptically suggests a new nature, paradigmatic of the ethos of Bensalem society. The absence of the mother, the symbolic icons associated with the father, and the primacy given to sons, project a fantasy of masculine generative power. Fertility is central to this celebration through the icon of the family. Most critics argue that Bacon appropriates the parental role solely

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera

in certain more recent writings, as a source of invention. Writers investigate metaphor, symbol, dream and fetish as signifiers of a national reality or as constituents of a sense of national being, rather than the nation as literal truth. Under a range of pressures – political dislocations and violence, economic trauma, geographical and cultural displacements, other forms of national schizophrenia – the made up nature of nationhood has emerged into greater prominence. And so, as the split between nationalist fantasy and nation-state reality has been teased open

in Stories of women
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female archetypes. Jung’s theories, and Robert Graves’s writings, are used as part of an illuminatory test of Jung’s assertion that ‘our world seems to be dis-infected of witches’,78 when the world is Ford’s positive fictions.79 Developing the discussion of religion, Chapter 6 compares Ford’s fantasy novel, The Young Lovell (1913), with the poem ‘On Heaven’, written at the same period. It seeks the religious equivalent of the symbolic healing of women to be found in Chapter 5, and investigates the peculiarly Fordian notion of peace. ‘Fantasies are scenarios of desire

in Fragmenting modernism