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Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice

Zealand’. 49 Blaming Europeans in Britain and New Zealand was a common theme of the campaign against Tawhiao. The Minister of Native Affairs, John Ballance, condemned those in Britain who sought to take issue with the treatment of indigenous peoples: ‘There is a demand in England for Native grievances.’ 50 With the government of New Zealand and the New Zealand press doing everything in their power to

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

throughout the colonial era and for some time during decolonisation and independence, agents of biomedicine, including missionaries, marginalised indigenous medical practitioners. The 1930s were a key time for nursing and medical expansion in Nigeria. Andrew G. Onokerhoraye notes that the inter-war years witnessed an expansion of hospitals such that by 1930, seventy-one were in existence and twenty-three were mission-owned, the latter reflecting both Protestant and Catholic expansion. At this time, the British colonial government supported missions that could develop rural

in Colonial caring

referred to by Angharad Fletcher in Chapter 2, nursing was being provided across 60 Nurses during the Anglo-Boer War (what was to become) ‘South Africa’ by a number of different agencies which have been described as ‘reflecting the disjointed course of colonial development [in South Africa]’.5 This ‘nursing’ included care by family members and traditional healers for much of the indigenous population, the basic nursing and medical knowledge of European missionaries, the presence of trained European nurses, as well as the Afrikaners’ and their servants’ own home

in Colonial caring
Colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40

4 ‘They do what you wish; they like you; you the good nurse!’:1 colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40 Linda Bryder Introduction In 1911 New Zealand’s Department of Public Health launched its Native Health nursing scheme, to serve the health needs of the local indigenous population, the Māori.2 At that time the Māori population numbered about 52,000; most lived in extremely isolated small communities and had much poorer health standards than non-Māori. The circular announcing the scheme explained that the appointees would be trained

in Colonial caring

dangerous of an earlier era were transformed and appropriated into the known and the safe of imperial ritual. They became incorporated into an imperial culture. Colonial officials developed customs and practices such as royal visits in a long-term cultural dance with Native Americans, South Asians, Africans, Maori, and Australian Aborigines, one dominated by Europeans but informed by the (imagined or real

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911

Indian culture. Earlier manifestations were to be found in accounts of tribals, but striking was the tendency increasingly to locate these pathologies in areas of indigenous settlement at the heart of colonial power. Here the so-called Black Town areas of Calcutta and Madras featured prominently. Descriptions of these areas were part of a nascent urban mythology that requires brief attention. References

in The other empire
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allowed humans to communicate with others at a considerable distance. Radio, at the start of the last century, extended that technical immediacy by allowing the human voice to be carried, wireless, across great distances. Television and film reinserted the represented physical presence of the speaking human, and their modern successors, the live videophone and videoconference, have facilitated meetings of individuals as far apart as Canada and Australia. More mundane instruments, unheard of twenty years ago, now fill our personal informational universes: cell phones

in The spoken word
Defending Cold War Canada

them as traitors. Purported links to the Soviet enemy were sufficient grounds to denounce Canadian Communist Party members, trades unionists and ‘peaceniks’. As Whitaker and Marcuse have suggested, the Cold War in Canada had an enormous impact upon progressive indigenous politics, which was ‘rendered so difficult by the false choices apparently imposed by the rigidities of the Cold War’. 29

in Female imperialism and national identity

were attempting to use it to redefine conceptions of child rights and human rights. By the early 1990s, societies specifically for autistic children had been created in forty countries, among them countries as diverse as Australia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Germany, Iceland, India, Japan, Russia and Trinidad and Tobago. 40 By the early 2000s, these organisations had spread to over eighty countries

in The metamorphosis of autism
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Clergy, orality and print in the Scottish Gaelic world

Gaelic. It is, however, possible that the main 101 The spoken word reason for the scarcity of indigenous Gaelic sermons in printed form was the understanding among both clergy and laity that real Gaelic preaching was essentially an oral art, performed and transmitted by the spoken word. Sermons, delivered spontaneously (or seemingly so) from the pulpit, were esteemed very highly in the Highlands. The sermon was the centre-piece of worship. In many parts of the Highlands and Islands, the whole experience of Gaelic worship was focused in the phrase aig an t-searmon (at

in The spoken word