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From an enabling towards a disabling state?
Gerhard Bosch and Steffen Lehndorff

(Pontusson, 2005). In virtually no other area can the balance of power shift as quickly as in the employment system, which is not without consequences for state action. While education and welfare systems, which are largely state-dominated, often exhibit considerable durability and path dependency, the same does not necessarily apply to 48 Making work more equal industrial relations. As a result of the deregulation of product and labour markets, free trade agreements, the privatisation of state activities, the transfer of functions from highly unionised plants to

in Making work more equal
Open Access (free)
Conceptual and ethodological challenges for comparative analysis
Agnieszka Piasna, Brendan Burchell, Kirsten Sehnbruch and Nurjk Agloni

relations, policies, participation or equality in income and job distributions) are often used interchangeably and without clear definitions. This inconsistency reflects the complexity of the whole issue of quality of work. There are not only multiple facets of jobs that should be taken into account, but also multiple levels on which jobs can be analysed, ranging from a subjective evaluation of a particular working environment to broad labour market systems in which jobs are performed. Furthermore, the definition of job quality and the selection of facets of employment

in Making work more equal
Analysing the example of data territorialisation
Andreas Baur-Ahrens

hierarchies with the aim of providing high availability and security. I argue that data territorialisation including national routing and storage requirements contributes to a general trend of cyberspace centralisation. Furthermore, I analyse the proposed changes to the Internet infrastructure with regard to power relations. Power and its analysis is an important part of mobility

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Diversification and the rise of fragmented time systems
Iain Campbell

Labour Organization), pp. 41–64. Campbell, I. (1993), ‘Labour market flexibility in Australia: enhancing management prerogative?’ Labour and Industry, 5:3, 1–32. Campbell, I. (2008), ‘Australia: institutional changes and workforce fragmentation’, in Lee, S. and Eyraud, F. (eds), Globalization, Flexibilization and Working Conditions in Asia and the Pacific (London: Chandos), pp. 115–52. Campbell, I. and van Wanrooy, B. (2013), ‘Long working hours and working-time preferences: between desirability and feasibility’, Human Relations, 66:8, 1131–55. Carré, F. (2016

in Making work more equal
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

and emotional conditions depending upon heavy doses of inequality, coercion and moral conditioning. The corporatist version would be more solidaristic, but might still make reproductivity depend upon a strict distribution of fixed roles across a conditional, hierarchical and familialist set of social relations. In short, just as there are free-market, corporatist and social democratic versions of productivism, so there could be free-market, corporatist and social democratic versions of post-productivism. Yet just as social democracy is the preferable version of the

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

universalism (to which they are not necessarily opposed) can be embodied in market relations, because markets treat everyone the same. Conversely, some on the Left have been critical of universalism in theory, but not necessarily in practice. They allege that universalism has either neglected or even suppressed a spectrum of social identities, categorical boundaries and cultural boundaries by implicitly treating white, heterosexual, able-bodied men as the normative ideal (Butler, 1990). This does not mean that universal services should be abandoned, merely that universality

in After the new social democracy
Vivien Walsh, Carole Cohen and Albert Richards

, within the innovating firm it is increasingly likely that cost centres and other forms of ‘market’ mechanism will have been introduced, so that one department may have to sell its services and other output, literally as well as figuratively, to another. Departments are now linked by market-type relations as well as by hierarchical management structures. This was also the case in Nimrod (and Hermes). At the same time, there has been an increasing tendency towards partnerships between organisations, including between potentially competing firms, in the production of

in Innovation by demand
Open Access (free)
Quality and processes of qualification
Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin and Alan Warde

ascriptions of quality alters the relations between the actors. In this book we have directed comparatively little attention up-stream. Marsden is an exception, in that he explores how quality is associated among producers in Wales with expensive local niche produce. Academics sometime succumb to the same temptation to consider quality as that which is not mass produced, to forget that consistency and low cost are attributes which appeal positively to a large section of the population. But in terms of producers appealing to niche markets – a practice which can only increase

in Qualities of food
Israeli security experience as an international brand
Erella Grassiani

sociale geografie 96(5): 506. Kimmerling, B., 1993. ‘Patterns of Militarism in Israel’, European Journal of Sociology 34(2): 196–223. Krahmann, E., 2008. ‘Security: Collective Good or Commodity?’, European Journal of International Relations 14(3): 379–404. Leander, A., 2005. ‘The Market for Force and Public Security: The Destabilizing Consequences of

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Becoming an “old maid”
Kinneret Lahad

run away from, according to their own accounts, is the desperation that those women express and not their age or biological clock. This very desperation is what makes them run—screaming—straight to the young breasts of twenty-year-olds. (Lior 2007) As these extracts demonstrate, the value of single women is determined by the evaluative gaze of men, a gaze which objectifies them according to their age. Moreover, the ageist and sexist market rules of supply and demand produce hierarchical age relations. The cultural preference for younger single women is also set in

in A table for one