Open Access (free)

appears more interesting or exciting, though there is doubt about a theoretical notion I may have used to achieve this effect, I will have accomplished what I am setting out to do. One of the core arguments of this study is that Beckett’s oeuvre is a manifestation of a narrative-self whose universe is organized by a dominant feeling of precarious connection to a primary, good internal presence. I read the work as a record of purely internal experience, and do not wish to make claims about the actuality of early deprivation or hostility on the part of external objects

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)

     Conclusion One of the major features of this book is its focus on various aspects of the subject and identity as they are conceived and represented in contemporary women’s writing in France. The contributors to this volume have overwhelmingly read the works of our chosen writers as tales of, quests for, explorations of, and crises in the self. It should be noted that this self is actually plural and that the selves in question are not necessarily those of the writers (either within or outside the text). Rather, as fictions, they

in Women’s writing in contemporary France

   The articulation of beur female identity in the works of Farida Belghoul, Ferrudja Kessas and Soraya Nini In view of the relatively recent literary success of works by secondgeneration Maghrebis born and brought up in France and the self-designatory origins of the term beur,1 this chapter examines the work of three beur women writers in order to establish the extent to which the highly specific socio-historical locus of the beur writer, when combined with her female subject position, may produce narrative similarities, whether formal or

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Murphy’s misrecognition of love

narrative flow, the characters, and imagery as reflective of the narrative-self that organizes the fiction. Levy writes: The book, then, is concerned far less with Murphy as one character than with the construction of a closed narrative system everywhere reflecting the abandonment or absence on which it rests. Every element in the novel either reflects Murphy or reflects other elements, which in turn reflect Murphy […] who is just a means of reflecting the experience of Nothing. The narrator has only to step forward, as he will in the later novels, and reveal that he has

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)
British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation

5 The Union and Jack: British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation BERTHOLD SCHOENE Starting with a general theoretical investigation into nationalist imageries of masculine and feminine embodiment, this essay offers a tentative outline of some of the most problematic shifts in the conceptualisation and literary representation of man, self and nation in Britain throughout the twentieth century. The second part of the essay comprises a close reading of John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger (1993 [1956]), which is to illustrate the syndromic inextricability

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Chantal Chawaf ’s melancholic autofiction

occupying the position of analyst in relation to the text. Vers la lumière does not offer a ‘case study’ of a melancholic, but, in exploring the relation between melancholia, fantasy and narrative, shows up the impossibility of describing Chawaf ’s melancholic autofiction  melancholia from one fixed and stable subject position. The merging of first- and third-person narrative voices highlights how in this text melancholia is always spoken from shifting subject positions that blur into each other. This also offers an alternative reading of Kristeva’s self-positioning in

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Gender and nationalism in the early fiction of Flora Nwapa

nationalist strategy. As Simon Gikandi once put it: ‘To write is to claim a text of one’s own; textuality is an instrument of territorial possession . . . narrative is crucial to our discovery of selfhood’.24 This idea of self-creation through narrative intersects with the Kristevan concept of excess in writing. Julia Kristeva observes, à propos of Barthes’s criticism, that writing is transformative, operating through the displacement of what is already signified, bringing forth the not-yet-imagined and the transgressive.25 Indebted to Bakhtin, yet concentrating on women

in Stories of women

’, ‘wymmen’, ‘ladies’, ‘man’, ‘burges’, and ‘peple’. As the level of suffering increases, so too does the humanising impulse with which the poet has throughout, sometimes lightly and sometimes emphatically, complicated his narrative. As is the case with many narratives of medieval England, The Siege of Jerusalem reveals the fissures inherent in ecclesiastical traditions: Jews are simultaneously ‘enemies’ and ‘fathers’, ‘other’ and ‘self’, and their representation has as much to do with the problematics of Christian identity as it does with Jewish. Jerusalem is often a

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)

only a surface alienation but a revisiting of lost sources in the self which can, if only temporarily, counteract that alienation. The search is essentially hopeful and aimed at a reunification of the divided self. The poet’s perilous descent into the land of the dead where ‘the slow corpses / Swag’ is also a descent toward some life-giving force.2 Though the poet is ‘dumb’ in the process of the dive, he must still return to his surface life, to air, light, and speech. Thus the poems become a narrative of these repeated forays into the self; brief illuminations of

in R. S. Thomas
Open Access (free)
Recognition, Vulnerability and the International

are, or ‘narrative imagination’ (Nussbaum 1997 : 9–11). The first capacity essential for cultivating humanity, Socratic self-examination, calls for a ‘life of questioning’ (Nussbaum 1997 : 21), whereby conventional beliefs and established traditions are subject to rigorous examination as we learn to think for ourselves. Nussbaum ( 1997 : 30) remarks that ‘the only kind of

in Recognition and Global Politics