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Thomas Dumm

, songs, memoirs, paintings, performances and other narratives in our united states of life. As you also know, I have been deeply influenced by Cavell’s understanding of film, and his understanding of skepticism and its relationship to moral perfectionism. I guess that this background is one reason I have been asked to be a respondent to your letter to Professor Cavell and your

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Letter to M. Cavell about cinema (a remake)
Joshua Foa Dienstag

Foucault’s title, the caring of the self, hence with a dissatisfaction, sometimes despair, with the self as it stands; so something to do with a progress of self-cultivation … The decisive difference of Emerson’s outlook from that in Plato’s Republic is that the soul’s journey to itself is not pictured as a continuous path

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

quote from the end of JFK advised –​but as just that: history. Was it any wonder that he lost traction in the mood of the times? Moreover, a related and potentially even bigger issue for him was the voguish style of cinema being employed. The force of the truth/​ fiction, artist/​ historian binaries that swirled around the director in those years, for example, lost its force as audiences adjusted to the new world order and sought different and less contested cinematic narratives away from Stone’s acerbic treatise. Pepper and McCrisken do a fine job of outlining many

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Ian Mackillop and Neil Sinyard

. Indeed there is more visual bravura in the British cinema of this time than is often recognised. Think of the virtuoso scene in Lean’s Hobson’s Choice (1953) when a drunken Charles Laughton is mesmerised by the reflection of the moon in a gleaming Manchester puddle; or, in the same film, the wonderful Victorian self-parody of the opening, the grim atmosphere deflated when the dark shadow of Laughton appears at the doorway

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

seen through fragments of iconic imagery and self-​conscious recall, to the construction of history paraded in 99 the stopping and starting of the tapes throughout the picture, from which Nixon tries to construct a new narrative contrary to the evidence at hand.47 All this tempted audiences with far more cerebral fare than other historical movies of the time. Stone took stock, and his answer was to move his politics into a different generic field: documentary. Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne Documentary as politics 100 Following the release of Any Given

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
History, legend and memory in John Sayles’ Lone Star
Neil Campbell

techniques such as intertextuality, superimposition, montage, seamless transitional editing, a hybridised soundtrack commenting on the film’s narrative, reiterative, liminal spaces within the film (drive-in, café, school, river, roadside stall, borderlands), as well as the complex web of characters and relationships that enhance the central themes of the film – secret histories, new identities and hybrid

in Memory and popular film
A cinematic response to pessimism
Davide Panagia

.). But, more than this, it is an exercise in remarking upon pictures and fictitious narratives, as if Cavell had taken this passage from Wittgenstein as his professional epigraph: “Don’t take it as a matter of course, but as a remarkable fact, that pictures and fictitious narratives give us pleasure, occupy our minds.” 17 The (erotic) pleasure of a mental occupancy, or what the

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
Margaret Kohn

grey.” In fact, Elizabeth did see things as either black or white, but grey begins to seep in. The Americans is not a show that teaches moral lessons. It does not tell us to do our Kantian duty or to privilege the family over country, or the cause over self-interest. Instead, it vividly depicts what Cavell calls “the moment of encounter or challenge.” 3 Part of the vividness

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism
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Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

collective memory and national identity has perhaps been most intensely debated in the historian’s own country, the US. In the last two decades of the twentieth century, as identity politics gained increasing validity, ‘minorities’ such as African-Americans and Asian-Americans pressed claims to an ‘authentic’ self-representation in the country’s influential signifying systems (the media, the schools

in Memory and popular film
The Spanish Gardener and its analogues
Alison Platt

called myself Pip and came to be called Pip,’ he says, in an act of self-naming. The film then shows young Pip running across the marshes against a darkening sky between a pair of gallows like a miniature saviour. He enters a churchyard and places flowers upon a grave on which the name ‘Phillip Pirrip’ is deeply engraved. As he looks fearfully round, already sensing Magwitch (Finlay Currie), just the

in British cinema of the 1950s