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Laura Suski

Critique of the Judgement of Taste , trans. Richard Nice ( Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press , 1984 ). Chen , Mel. Y. , Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect ( Durham, NC and London : Duke University Press , 2012 ). Cook , D. T. , ‘ The Missing Child in Consumption Theory ’, Journal of Consumer Culture , 8 : 2 ( 2008 ), pp. 219 – 43 . Cross , G. , ‘ Toys ’, in P. Fass (ed.), Encyclopedia of

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Mark Tomlinson and Andrew McMeekin

routines within organisations (especially firms), looking at the degree to which they are stable, the extent to which they change and the implications of these dynamics. In particular, the notion of routines has been used to understand apparent path dependence in the technological innovations that emerge from the firm. The central motivation for studying routines comes from empirical observations of recurrent action, which do not easily fit into a neoclassical utility-maximising framework. Hodgson has written several papers that question the validity of theories of

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Abortion prevention

Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s

Ingrid Ryberg

’ (1984) [‘Investigation about the situation of homosexuals in society’], would put homosexuality on the official political agenda as a legitimate social and civil rights issue in Sweden, paving the way for cohabitation, anti-​ discrimination, parental and marital rights during the following decades. The two rare lesbian films examined in this chapter, largely forgotten and overlooked in Swedish film history as well as in feminist and queer historiography, anticipate these crucial shifts in the official medical, legal and social understanding of homosexuality in Sweden

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“That dangerous contention”

A cinematic response to pessimism

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Davide Panagia

“preference” nor “liking.” I mean, rather, that ambiguous set of practices and capacities that enable pairings and couplings to come into occasion – let us call such pairings and couplings “assemblages” (Deleuze), or “queer connexions” (Wittgenstein), or “partitions” (Rancière). Recall how Cavell begins Pursuits of Happiness by declaring that the

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Birgit Lang

and works of creative artists con­ tributed significantly to the appreciation of certain medical, psychiatric and psychological phenomena. Such an undertaking was supported by readers who were variously invested in medical discourse – perhaps as patients of sexologists, or as cultural critics, such as Max Nordau, who popularised and generalised degeneration theory to serve his own pessi­ mistic views of contemporary society. At the same time, the idealising majority of Germany’s educated middle class perceived the psychiatrists’ deliberations on genius and

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Mandy Merck

. Unlike the feature melodrama, which comes, however ambiguously, to a conclusion, the soap opera can go on and on. And thus it has readily contributed to the identification of the Crown’s continuity with that of the nation, as endorsed by the writer himself. VICTORIAN INVENTIONS Malcolm Muggeridge suspected that the royal family had developed ‘a taste for the publicity which, in theory, they find so repugnant

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A, A and B

Coding same-sex union in Amis and Amiloun

Sheila Delany

’s discussion of this legend and critique of Gaunt’s essay, in Before the Closet: Same-Sex Love from Beowulf to Angels in America (Chicago, 1998). For example in Thomas Stehling (trans.), Medieval Latin Poems of Male Love and Friendship (New York and London, 1984); Michael Goodich, Homosexuality in the Later Medieval Period (Oxford, 1979); John Boswell, Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality: Gay People in Western Europe from the Beginning of the Christian Era to the Fourteenth Century (Chicago, 1980). Many social historians and queer-theory scholars emphasise the

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Stephen Mitchell

In his provocatively entitled Cows, Pigs, Wars, and Witches: The Riddles of Culture , anthropologist Marvin Harris suggests a one-dimensional explanation for the witch-hunts of early modern Europe, an all-encompassing theory of class warfare manipulated by elite culture, in effect, ‘the magic bullet of society’s privileged and powerful classes’. Of course, the case for the marriage of anthropology and

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Nonlinear reading

The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes

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Heather Blatt

culture: queer theory and digital media (New York: Routledge, 2015); Stuart Moulthrop, ‘You say you want a revolution? Hypertext and the laws of media’, The new media reader (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003), 691–704, at 699; and Davida Charney, ‘The effect of hypertext on processes of reading 98 Participatory reading in late-medieval England and writing’, in Literacy and computers: the complications of teaching and learning with technology, ed. Cynthia L. Selfe and Susan Hilligoss (New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1994), 238–63, at 259. 15 Martin

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Conclusion

Nonreading in late-medieval England

Series:

Heather Blatt

that echoes through the letter’s movement. Facilitated by Pandarus, the letter here asserts a violent, sexualized authority over Criseyde’s body, acting not only as a communicative object and love-token, but as assailant. This work of the letter thus queers Criseyde’s body as the two intermingle, destabilizing Criseyde’s bodily privacy and independence. In this way, analysing the work of nonreading in this scene shows how the letter compromises Criseyde’s bodily autonomy, thus undermining her earlier claim that ‘I am myn owene womman’ (II.750). This loss of autonomy