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An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

The hegemonic ideology of the early decades of the twentieth century, however, remained loyalism. Defined as personal allegiance to the sovereign, it was conceived as the uniting thread of the British Empire, as it was supposed to override religious or ethnic affiliation. 17 A British subject in the 1930s was still defined as one who ‘recognized the King as his Lord’, and owed allegiance to the King

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

History of the British Empire, Companion series: Missions and Empire (Oxford, 2005); J. P. Daughton, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880–1914 (Oxford, 2006); Stewart J. Brown, Providence and Empire: Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom 1815–1914 (London, 2008); Esther Breitenbach, Empire and Scottish Society: The Impact of Foreign Missions at Home, c. 1790–c.1914 (Edinburgh, 2009); Hilary M. Carey, God’s Empire: Religion and Colonialism in the British World, c. 1801–1908 (Cambridge, 2011). 44 Keith

in Population, providence and empire
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa
Anna Greenwood and Harshad Topiwala

a medical subordinate with a less prestigious diploma or a certificate. 24 The disparities in nomenclature are revealing both of the lower status that Britain attributed to Indian medical qualifications and also of deeply embedded racial beliefs that ultimately saw the true leaders of the British Empire as white. Indians in the Colonial Medical Service before 1923

in Beyond the state
Charles V. Reed

Instead of wasting British time through improvement projects and economic development, Lytton proposed, the British ought to hold a grand durbar to celebrate Victoria’s new title, Empress of India. This chapter explores how colonial officials embraced this impulse toward ornamentalism between 1860 and 1911 by developing a shared repertoire of ritual practices across the British Empire and how these

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge
Katie Pickles

war-dead; those ‘sons of the British Empire’ whose heroic sacrifice must not be forgotten and whose dependants must be cared for with dignity. 6 The problem was not confined to the Canadian war-dead. Soldiers from all parts of the Empire lay unidentified in South Africa. It was not long before the newly formed Victoria League attempted to take control of the project – from London. However, because the

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

between geography and imperial emigration. 31 Racist ideologies constructed a variety of environments throughout the British Empire as healthful for Anglo-Celts. As previous chapters have shown, Canada was portrayed as a healthy place, a northern environment of strength where ‘British stock’ thrived. 32 To advance the Canadian climate as being easy for British immigrants to acclimatize to, the Canadian

in Female imperialism and national identity
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

unrelated phrase – ‘British empire’.2 Yet as many historians of Ireland, its diaspora and particularly the Irish Catholic Church have noted, the existence of a peculiarly Irish ‘spiritual empire’ was widely spoken of even as the country’s ports remained choked with emigrants. This concept, normally involving the perception of a special, God-given emigrants’ ‘mission’ to spread the faith in whatever part of the world they settled, is somewhat problematic given the practical limitations explored in chapter three. Nevertheless, as a continually employed explanation of Irish

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

7 Looking back Seven young and adolescent children sit with an older man, eating melon in a working field in Jamaica, around 1860. They are wearing the working clothes of the agricultural poor. It is likely that they are indentured labourers, bound to both the land and white settler farms by indenture contracts which dominated the imperial economy in Jamaica after the abolition of slavery. This photo, entitled ‘These water melons’ (figure 5), captures a particular intimate moment of the British Empire. Kate Anderson and Graham Mortimer Evelyn (2019) remind us

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

consider more appropriately what the relationship is between citizens who are never allowed to belong and those who are formally made deportable, and with that killable. And in turn we must consider how this structures citizenship more broadly. This is what I turn to now, offering up some examples to remind us how citizenship functioned across the British Empire, in processes of colonial domestication, before reflecting on the reworking of deprivation and monstrousness today as an extension and readaptation of colonial rule. Deprivations under empire On 27 April 1888

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

adventure novels of G. A. Henty and Henry Rider Haggard had long provided a template for male action within the field of enterprise that formed the British Empire.4 But girls read these novels too. And if this created a sense of dissonance – because all the heroes were boys – they could turn to a small but burgeoning corpus of ‘girl’s own adventure’ writings. Although limited, this included the novels of Bessie Marchant, whose heroines faced challenge and hardship and experienced ‘heroic adventure’.5 While her plot resolutions often involved marriage, Marchant’s heroines

in Nurse Writers of the Great War