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Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

adventure novels of G. A. Henty and Henry Rider Haggard had long provided a template for male action within the field of enterprise that formed the British Empire.4 But girls read these novels too. And if this created a sense of dissonance – because all the heroes were boys – they could turn to a small but burgeoning corpus of ‘girl’s own adventure’ writings. Although limited, this included the novels of Bessie Marchant, whose heroines faced challenge and hardship and experienced ‘heroic adventure’.5 While her plot resolutions often involved marriage, Marchant’s heroines

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Ben Dew

200 COMMERCE, FINANCE AND STATECRAFT Conclusion The Monthly Review for September 1790 contained a lengthy discussion of the final volume of John Sinclair’s The History of the Public Revenue of the British Empire (1785–90). While appreciative of Sinclair’s work, the anonymous reviewer opened his discussion with some general, and rather less positive, comments on the treatment of financial issues by previous English historians: History, till of late, was chiefly employed in the recital of warlike transactions. […] The people were not known; the circumstances

in Commerce, finance and statecraft
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

break with previous policy and a search for a new and different solution to the problem of Caribbean sugar. In the eighteenth century, the West Indian colonies were said to be the richest part of the British Empire, and in 1770 it was estimated that the annual profits from Caribbean sugar were £1.7 million. 7 Sugar from British imperial sources was privileged in the British market from the beginning. From 1651, the Navigation Acts restricted foreign imports to England and its colonies by dictating that only English ships could take goods to the

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Colonial subjects and the appeal for imperial justice
Charles V. Reed

, knowledge, migration, military power, and political intervention’, as Tony Ballantyne and Antoinette Burton argue, ‘allowed certain communities to assert their influence and sovereignty over other groups’. 6 In the British Empire, information itself, neither free nor evenly distributed, was regulated and controlled by the growing cultural resonance of racialised settler discourses, recently empowered

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts
Markku Hokkanen

authority as a government MO by assuming sole responsibility for medical certification. Leprosy collaboration in the interwar era As elsewhere in the British Empire, leprosy relief in Malawi brought government and missions together in formal collaboration in the interwar period. The government subsidised the treatment of leprosy patients through modest sums and

in Beyond the state
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

immigration spokesperson Laura Thompson wrote in 1926: Should we now not recognize that Canada’s continuance as part of the British Empire may be imperiled by a failure to build up a population resolved to remain loyal to that Empire? Should we now allow ourselves to be timorous as to the possibility of Canada, this

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

During the 1930s, episodes of violent protest by the inhabitants of Britain’s Caribbean colonies brought the extremely poor living and working conditions that existed in these territories to domestic and international attention. Revelations of widespread unemployment, squalid housing and malnutrition threatened the moral authority of British rule and provided fuel for critics of British imperialism. As a result, Britain made a commitment to improving living conditions in an area of the British Empire that it had previously neglected. This

in Science at the end of empire
Hysterical tetanus in the Victorian South Pacific
Daniel Simpson

; as with rumours of cannibalism, reports of poison were fleeting, vague, and requiring of little evidentiary support. 6 Much of Messer's argument was therefore controversial at the time. Lauded not only in Sydney society but throughout the British Empire as a paragon of the rational, moral, and Christianly virtues then thought to exemplify the ‘modern’ condition, Goodenough was an inauspicious target for the surgeon's claim that a ‘civilised’ state could be lost as well as

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

equated the suffering of Jews in Germany with blacks in the British colonies, especially those in the white settler societies. In an article which carried the title ‘The British empire is worst racket yet invented by man’ he indicted the British for exercising in southern Africa the ‘most blatant expression of racial superiority’, which produced for the blacks a situation ‘more tragic even than that of

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Christine E. Hallett

-class ladies of the British Empire brought a strong element of patriotism to their writings, even as they began to realise that the war was not the simple crusade against a marauding Teutonic horde they had believed it to be. It also inclined them to express a remarkable level of confidence in their own natural abilities as nurturers of the wounded.56 A project that they embraced with particular eagerness was the presentation of nursing itself as an ordeal, through which only the strongest could pass unscathed. The ‘truth’ that most seemed anxious to convey was that nursing

in Nurse Writers of the Great War