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The predicament of history

determined to work through for themselves an idea of life after colonialism. If for the domestic British decolonisation was something which occurred ‘elsewhere’ – overseas and out of sight – then the Caribbean experience may provide a partial exception: it happened, had those in the metropole only been able to see, before their very eyes. In recovering these traditions of intellectual thought we

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past

. Patarau, By-Products of the Cane Sugar Industry (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1989). 3 Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , Conclusion.

in Science at the end of empire
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, the massive legacies of colonialism in the social and economic sphere continue to challenge the different sense of community that is now being built in the new South Africa. Notes 1 R. Bartlett, ‘Citizens Minus: Indians and the Right to Vote’, Saskatchewan Law Review , 44 (1979–80), p. 189

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
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Subcontinent, 1765–1856 , Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1978; Charles Batten, Pleasurable Instruction. Form and Convention in Eighteenth-Century Travel Writing , Berkeley, University of California Press, 1978; Sara Mills, Discourses of Difference. An Analysis of Women’s Travel Writing and Colonialism , London, Routledge, 1991; Dennis Porter, Haunted Journeys. Desire and

in The other empire
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poor resulted from attempts to understand the anachronistic presence in the modern metropolis of a population that defied modernity. 101 It was historically coterminous with the emergence of a distinctly modern colonialism characterized by a ‘coherently “anthropological” mode of typifying natives’. 102 In this endeavour race was originally an analytical category with which human culture could be

in The other empire

of the British government (p. 44). 5 TNA, CO 852/1037/1. 6 TNA, CO 852/874/5. 7 TNA, CO 852/874/5. 8 Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , pp. 253–255. 9 TNA, CO 295/642/4. 10 National Archives of Trinidad and Tobago (NATT), Box 6, no. 4, “Report of the Economics Committee, 1949”. 11 K. Meighoo, Politics in a Half-Made Society: Trinidad and Tobago 1925–2001 (Kingston: Ian Randle

in Science at the end of empire
The BBC’s Caribbean Voices

it the prospect of emancipation from colonialism. As Jarrett-Macauley states: She was invited to broadcast morale-boosting talks on West Indians and the war effort: ‘The empire at war and the colonies’ went out on 1 April 1940 and ‘West Indians’ part in war’ later that month. She ended one broadcast: ‘I am

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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, neither much tainted by its conditions of production nor transformed by the pragmatics of colonial encounters and struggles’ (Nicholas Thomas, Colonialism’s Culture. Anthropology, Travel and Government , London, Polity Press, 1994, p. 60). 45 Thomas Beames, The Rookeries of London. Past

in The other empire

. 47 TNA, CO 927/88/6. 48 TNA, CO 847/36/4. 49 Lee and Petter, The Colonial Office, War and Development Policy , p. 171; Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , pp. 204–205; S. Clarke, “A technocratic imperial state? The Colonial Office and scientific research, 1940–1960”, Twentieth Century British History 18(4) (2007), 453–480. 50 TNA, CO 852/588/2; Lee and Petter, The Colonial Office, War and Development Policy , pp. 171–172. 51 M. Worboys, “The

in Science at the end of empire

Second World War: a career in the making”, Canadian Journal of History 16 (1981), 68–85. 10 TNA, CO 852/588/2. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid. 13 C. Whitham, Bitter Rehearsal: British and American Planning for a Post-War West Indies (Westport: Praeger, 2002), p. 38; C. Fraser, Ambivalent Anti-Colonialism: The United States and the Genesis of West Indian Independence, 1940–1964 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1994), pp. 59 and 64. 14 Parker

in Science at the end of empire