Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

humans truly were naturally violent and that violence came easily to them, would there not be more cases of violent outrage and self-destruction among impoverished communities? What is more, most of the extreme cases of human slaughter throughout history have taken place within the bounds of domestic and international law. They have been fully in keeping with the prevailing normative claims to truth and its ritualised performances. Very rarely does violence come to us in a truly sporadic or spontaneous way. All political violence has a history and most often it is

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller and Róisín Read

independent and rigorous, though not exclusively quantitative, analysis. The reader may ponder how realistic such a prescription is, as similar to the term genocide, the term famine comes not only with specific connotations of destitution, but a call for action by the international (humanitarian) community that political leaders may always as much resist as welcome ( Read, 2016 ). Data on food insecurity and famine is always more than technical data, as Maxwell and Hailey’s six cases demonstrate in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell and Peter Hailey

considerable political influences that prevent or limit good analysis ( Bailey, 2012 ; Buchanan-Smith et al. , 2019 ). Lurking in the background is the age-old humanitarian dilemma of sovereignty: do sovereign states have the sole right to declare crises (and famines) within their own boundaries? What is the role and obligation of the international community? Humanitarian agencies are often caught between waiting for a government or an ‘official’ process to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
David Rieff

curbs on the public declarations of NGOs imposed by the Sri Lankan government during and after its war against the Tamil Tigers. Medical NGOs will almost certainly have an easier time than, say, groups focusing on community development or psycho-social care, but taken in aggregate the humanitarian world will be less transformed by a post-North Atlantic world than the Northern human rights movement. 4 Humanitarian action has never been a zero-sum game, whereas that is precisely what human rights activism has to be to be morally coherent. So far

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

racialised ‘others’ – a criticism also levelled at the international community’s focus on conflict-related sexual violence over much more prevalent intimate partner violence in conflict zones ( IRC, 2017 ). Sexual Violence and Harassment in Aid Against this securitised backdrop, sexual violence has largely been framed as a danger facing aid workers from outside the sector – that is, from the ‘other’, namely armed actors and the local population. The 2016 sexual

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

security more broadly, commonly distinguishes three types of strategy: acceptance, deterrence and protection ( Egeland et al. , 2011 ; Humanitarian Practice Network, 2010 ). Acceptance aims to reduce the threat through soft measures, such as building relationships with local communities and stakeholders to obtain their consent for the agency’s presence and work ( Humanitarian Practice Network, 2010 : xv). Deterrence, by contrast, ‘attempts to deter a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

family ties, whether among rural or urban communities ( Rugh, 1996 ; Rabo, 2008 ), Damascene elites ( Salamandra, 2004 ) or minority sects like the Druze ( Kastrinou, 2016 ), through marriage, and mundane and extraordinary forms of hospitality. Extended Syrian families often functioned as profitable economic units, with different household members taking on paid or unpaid tasks (e.g. Rugh, 1996 ; Rabo, 2008 ). This networked perception of Syrian women’s lives is vital to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

the professional spheres. If all social interaction is performative, we all play multiple and overlapping roles, and few follow the same social script at work as when they are with their friends ( Goffman, 1978 ). In MSF however, this is particularly exaggerated: MSF imagines volunteers to be ‘unencumbered by social obligations at home’, similarly acquiring ‘few in the field’ ( Redfield, 2012 : 362). For many Congolese staff, this is a particularly complex endeavour: some are members of the communities in which they live and work, embedded in political and social

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Fabrice Weissman

). 4 Abducted in Chechnya in January 2001 by a group of Islamist fighters, the Dutch section head of mission was released after 26 hours, and a letter of apology was published by his captors on the website kavkaz.org. Seeking support from the international community, the armed opposition took advantage of his release to announce its decision to ‘ban all kidnappings of aid workers’. In Colombia, an MSF volunteer held for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

individual human life and for that person’s own interests and projects, the appeals of humanitarians become mere arguments, opinions, preferences, not obligations anchored in fundamental and shared moral rules. Those who challenge legitimate authority can now be painted as anti-social elements who fragment society and threaten political stability, who undermine moral probity and who are a danger to the community, which has an overwhelming collective interest in stopping them. And they can be stopped even with the use of lethal violence (Presidents

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs