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Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

something else. The emergence of the orientation in cultural studies towards ‘popular culture’ of all kinds is in this respect a logical response to the suspicion that works from the great traditions may now no longer (if, of course, they ever did) have a decisive influence on political and social life. This does not, however, obviate aesthetic questions, even in relation to popular culture. The danger here is that an apparent openness to what supposedly (and sometimes actually) elitist positions have unjustifiably ignored can in fact be based on another kind of failure

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Reading SimCity
Barry Atkins

other forms of text emphasise a lack of closure and celebrate narrative uncertainty, SimCity appears to offer access to a plurality of choice and individual experience within the mass product of consumer capitalism. As the use of the term ‘god-game’ to describe such game-fictions implies, there is something about such management games that can be seen as empowering and liberating – we are not the passive consumer of this product of mass popular culture, we are allowed the illusion of not only ‘human’ but ‘godly’ agency. chap5.p65 115 13/02/03, 14:23 116 More than

in More than a game
Louis James

developments in Caribbean culture came from elsewhere. Working in the early morning cool in my office, the rattle of my typewriter echoed that of Brathwaite working in the History Department above, and we became friends. He was working on poems he was to build into his longer work, Rights of Passage (1967), and researching into Jamaican popular culture. 9 When I was

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Becoming an “old maid”
Kinneret Lahad

4 Facing the horror: becoming an 1 “old maid” The blatant contradiction that exists between the terms “old maid” and “young single woman” is not merely anecdotal data from the flippant lingo of contemporary popular culture, but rather a significant cue for understanding the tenor of our times. Despite dramatic changes in family lifestyles coupled with growing numbers of single women, the well-worn myth of the aging single woman as a miserable yet terrifying old maid appears to have resisted these trends. Rather, the myth persists, as a naturalized, undisputed

in A table for one
Competing imaginaries of science and social order in responsible (research and) innovation
Stevienna de Saille and Paul Martin

thought of as signifiers of disorientation in imaginaries of progress, markers for that which cannot easily be assigned to one side of the binary or the other, perhaps cannot even be properly categorised at all because they too are unknown, like the warnings placed over the uncharted portion of an incomplete map. To illustrate these points more clearly in the discussion that follows, we will draw upon both the Frankenstein story, as one of the original monsters in the socio-technical imaginary of progress through science, and more recent metaphors from popular culture

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

and third generations, who are referred to by Walcott ( 2001 ) as the authentic arbiters of black popular culture in Canada. Many club members expressed disappointment that their Canadian-born (grand-)sons were not interested in the sport of cricket. As Gilroy ( 2005 ) astutely observes of this generation in Britain, “[tall] children want to play basketball rather than bowl, and the fundamental idea that a wholly satisfying

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Barry Atkins

relation to computer hardware, and in wider popular culture itself. Interest here, as in the spoof ‘rockumentary’ This is Spinal Tap (1984), is in the piece of equipment with the dial that goes up to eleven. ‘Better’ equates with an often disappointed promise of excess, with an impossible ‘louder’ in the case of Spinal Tap’s amplifier, and not with the quality of the sound produced. Or, in the case of such a privileging of the newest or latest computer game-fiction, better equates with faster artificial intelligence routines, bigger levels, higher framerates, more

in More than a game
Open Access (free)
Simon Parry

, technology, education or communication. If it is important for grime MCs and dermatologists to have conversations about skin, as I believe it is, there may be a need for some undisciplined research as well as practice. Chapter 3 attempts to bring into cosmopolitics practices that might already be valued commercially or artistically but that I attempt to revalue as ways of knowing. My conclusion is not that theatrical processes for commoning sense are necessarily to be found at the margins or among the avant-garde, they may just as well be within popular culture. In some

in Science in performance
Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

texts under examination are viewed as cultural sites, in which the discursive construction of the socio-temporal aspects of singlehood are reflected and produced. That is, the selection of data for this study stems from the contention that popular culture, everyday talk, and new media technologies affect, sustain, and alter the deeply ingrained understandings through which singlehood is constituted and formed nowadays.8 The methodology and choice of materials is closely linked to these rapidly changing social realities. In other words, this study is attuned both to

in A table for one
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

political journalism on the border of popular culture, a political journalism which moves within the historically persistent and lucrative domain of spectacle, scandals, and celebrities, according to media researcher John Hartley: An endless succession of scandals, from royal mistresses to Monica Lewinsky, continually remind us that sex remains one of the most potent elements of political journalism. The staples of popular culture 106Exposed – scandal, celebrity, bedroom antics – are the very propellant of modern journalism and therefore modern ideas. (Hartley 2008

in Exposed