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The failure of history
Neil Macmaster

-dominated organisation in which the values of the warrior rested on a conservative view of female domesticity and subordination, should have had any interest in the plight of Algerian women. A complex of factors contributed to this innovative shift: faced with significant progressive reform of family law in Tunisia, Morocco and elsewhere, the French government did not want to be seen to fall behind and to give a hostage to those interests that were seeking to pillory French colonialism before the UN and the M1822 - MACMASTER TEXT.indd 395 21/7/09 12:16:33 396 Burning the veil

in Burning the veil
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

Britain’s colonies. Notes 1 The Times , “Marines landed at Trinidad: disorders spreading” (23 June 1937), p. 15. 2 The Times , “Another warship at Trinidad, three strikers shot” (26 June 1937), p. 13. 3 Constantine, British Colonial Development Policy ; Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development ; Morgan, Official History of Colonial Development ; Butler, Industrialisation . 4 Bolland, On the March

in Science at the end of empire
Neil Macmaster

not constitute a significant issue: the immediate life-and-death business of waging war and of national survival was thought to be far too urgent a matter to allow energies to be diverted in this direction and women’s equality it was thought would be almost automatically achieved through independence and liberation from colonialism.1 However, the FLN was forced during the course of the war to take a position on women for two reasons: firstly, women gradually assumed a de facto role in the conflict, playing a major part in urban networks and the maquis as gun and

in Burning the veil
The changing scale of warfare and the making of early colonial South Asia
Manu Sehgal

for territorial conquest as the engine of colonial expansion were fashioned to expand the scale of colonial war-making. Taken together – ideological structures, political justifications of territorial conquest, economic restructuring of the state apparatus, and a regime of laws that normalized prolific state-authored violence – these elements came to constitute a distinct early colonial order for South Asia. Conquest as a violent transformation of territory has generally not received attention from historians of South Asia. The study of colonialism and the

in A global history of early modern violence
Michael Woolcock, Simon Szreter, and Vijayendra Rao

obscuring the less savoury aspects of that process (slavery, colonialism, exploitation, suppression, theft).13 Moreover, they argue, as part of this obfuscation, the mantra of ‘development’ enables the rich to lecture the poor about their putative political, cultural and moral failings, doing so as a pretext to encouraging (if not forcing) them to buy goods and resources (by going deeply into debt) and/or to adopt policy measures, institutional reforms and behavioural traits that they are told will surely correct these failings (but in fact will most likely serve only to

in History, historians and development policy
Anna Greenwood

8 Denise Roth Allen, Managing Motherhood, Managing Risk: Fertility and Danger in West Central Tanzania , Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2002 ; Valarie Fildes, Lara Marks and Hilary Marland (eds.), Women and Children First: International Maternal and Infant Welfare, 1870–1945 , London, Routledge, 1992 ; Sarah Hodges, Contraception, Colonialism and

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940
Yolana Pringle

, 1970; Kirk Arden Hoppe, Lords of the Fly: Sleeping Sickness Control in British East Africa, 1900–1960 , Westport, CT, Praeger, 2003 ; Kuhanen, Poverty, Health and Reproduction ; Carol Summers, ‘Intimate Colonialism: The Imperial Production of Reproduction in Uganda, 1907–1925’, Signs , 16, 4, 1991 , pp. 787–807; Michael William Tuck, ‘Syphilis, Sexuality, and Social

in Beyond the state
Collective violence in colonial Spanish
Anthony McFarlane

away from the centre.47 And, now that the Pax Hispanica was finally erased amid intense competition for power, collective violence became a much more frequent feature of political life. Notes   1 See, for example, P. Dwyer and A. Nettelbeck, ‘“Savage Wars of Peace”:  Violence, Colonialism and Empire in the Modern World’, in P. Dwyer  and A. Nettelbeck (eds),  Violence, Colonialism and Empire in the Modern World (Cham, Switzerland, 2018).  2 The case for a Pax Hispanica in Mexico is made by F. Katz, ‘Rural Uprisings in Preconquest and Colonial Mexico’, in F. Katz

in A global history of early modern violence
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

evidence of the importance of its adaptability. Literature on colonialism that generalizes about the colonizing process often implies a rupture in political rule or an event of cultural resistance as the defining moment in the identity of a nation. As the country’s hegemonic identity has been controlled by Canada’s Anglo-Celtic immigrants from the imperial centre, attempting to impose a white settler

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Charles V. Reed

Cannadine, ‘The Context, Performance and Meaning of Ritual’, 120–1. 8 Cannadine, Ornamentalism , 4. 9 Bernard Cohn, Colonialism and Its Forms of Knowledge (Princeton, 1996); Nicholas Dirks, Castes of Mind: Colonialism and the Making of Modern

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911