Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

) of social worlds. These are issues to which I shall return. The point now is that the account ahead explores the elaborations of identities within historical anthropology, including postcolonial perspectives and subaltern approaches. In these domains, identities have been articulated as part of critical considerations, at once theoretical and empirical, not only of colony and community and empire and nation, but also of

in Subjects of modernity
Charles V. Reed

Instead of wasting British time through improvement projects and economic development, Lytton proposed, the British ought to hold a grand durbar to celebrate Victoria’s new title, Empress of India. This chapter explores how colonial officials embraced this impulse toward ornamentalism between 1860 and 1911 by developing a shared repertoire of ritual practices across the British Empire and how these

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Legitimization and limits of Mughal military violence in early modern South Asia
Pratyay Nath

engaged in fighting’.1 Abul Fazl argues that on the present occasion, they had to be punished because of the ‘great zeal and activity’ they had shown in defending the fort against the Mughal army.2 Was this incident just a plain act of revenge against an adversary that had offered dogged resistance against imperial expansion? What does this massacre tell us about the larger history of how the empire justified similar acts of military violence? Was the way Abul Fazl legitimized the massacre of the civilian population of Chitor different from how instances of violence

in A global history of early modern violence
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

In May 1910 Edward VII, king of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of India, who had assumed the throne on the death of his mother Queen Victoria in 1901, died at the age of 68. He had worn the Crown which held together an Empire of formidable extent that ranged across a quarter of the globe and included over 300 million people. 1 Of these, nearly 19 million were settlers, most of British

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand
Charles V. Reed

subjects at home and in the empire, both projects represented the progress and development of an expanding British world. Cape Town newspaper writers and colonial officials celebrated this day as one of the most important in all the history of South Africa. It was a historic day, they would suggest, a day when the Cape Colony began to transform from a backwater of the British Empire to an important depot of commerce

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

) The above event, and the narrative of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre more broadly, provides a compelling theorisation of familial domesticity and the regulation of mobility under the British Empire. Bertha Mason, the subject of the above passage, is presented as the first ‘creole’ wife of Mr Rochester, one of the central protagonists in the novel. Her incarceration 30 Bordering intimacy in the attic of Rochester’s house remains a powerful example of the nature of racialisation and control in Victorian England. This chapter uses the figure of Bertha and her

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

, barriers to citizenship and infrastructural blockages, and are performed in the everyday racism and structural violence that the airline crew member was subjected to and was forced (through economic survival and labour market pressure) to enact. Bordering can be performed and policed by legal categories of the state, by international organisations and private companies, just as it is enacted in spit from the mouth of the racist. In revealing a series of circulations that tie together questions of intimacy, family, race, empire, borders, this event opens up a series of

in Bordering intimacy
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

familiar to those of other patriotic organizations around the Empire, promoting the English language and an imperial curriculum at every opportunity. During the interwar years the IODE’s preference for British immigration was strengthened through collaboration with both Canadian and British governments, attempting to overcome the contradictions between the policies of the two nations. To assimilate people

in Female imperialism and national identity
Chinese puzzles and global challenges
R. Bin Wong

about social welfare challenges in the contemporary world may want to include some new historical lessons. China’s durability as a territorial unit is frequently noted by both specialists and in more general discussions, but it is more often assumed and taken as a natural fact than it is taken as a condition to be explained. Since no other imperial state in world history has bequeathed to its successors in the twenty-first century a government that continues to rule most all the territory and a far vaster population than was once ruled by an empire, China

in History, historians and development policy
German reception of French subsidies in the Thirty Years’ War
Tryntje Helfferich

2 ‘Unter den Schutz Frankreichs’: German reception of French subsidies in the Thirty Years’ War Tryntje Helfferich Introduction Historians have embraced the term ‘Thirty Years’ War’ for the multifaceted conflict that devastated Central Europe between 1618 and 1648. At its heart, this was a civil war fought within the confines of the Holy Roman Empire, driven in large part by religious conflict and by fundamental disagreements over the very nature of the empire and the balance between princely liberties and imperial power. This internal German war was also of

in Subsidies, diplomacy, and state formation in Europe, 1494–1789