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Culture, criticism, theory since 1990
Scott Brewster

‘can be seemingly modernised and given a patina of legitimacy through identification with genuine liberation struggles in the Third World’.66 Indeed, Deane’s statement about the necessity of new modes of critical thought seemed at once to question and reaffirm essentialism: ‘Everything, including our politics and our literature, has to be rewritten – i.e. re-read. That will enable new writing, new politics, unblemished by Irishness but securely Irish’.67 Yet, as Colin Graham has argued, Field Day aligned itself with a developing postcolonial critique of the nation

in Irish literature since 1990
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Southern worlds, globes, and spheres
Sarah Comyn and Porscha Fermanis

to read and thereby participate fully in the social life of the colony’. Examining the close relationship between ‘literacy and cultural legitimacy’ in a range of periodicals and missionary writing, as well as in Egbert’s poetry, Chander argues that Indigenous Guianese peoples, or Amerindians, were ‘understood as essentially illiterate’ and ‘always in danger of falling back into a pre-civilised’ and pre-Christian state, thereby becoming the ‘cultural field’s abject other’. Drawing on the idea of Creole indigeneity, ‘whereby Creole claims to belonging erase those of

in Worlding the south
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Self-entrapment in Waiting for Godot
John Robert Keller

something absolutely required by the self (of which Vladimir and Estragon are manifestations). This is not any sort of legitimacy, which would imply a false-self compliance, but a secure internal sense of love and recognition. The characters cannot be literally nostalgic, since this primary connection is something they have not had. The ‘infinite, postmodern world’ is understandable only as a part of the totality of the human mental universe. It is the province of those Keller_05_ch4 133 23/9/02, 11:00 am 134 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love positions of the

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

’, see Robert Tracy, ‘Maria Edgeworth and Lady Morgan: legality versus legitimacy’, Nineteenth-century fiction , 40.1 (1985), 1–22. 68 On the similarities and differences between The wild Irish girl and St Clair , in particular, see Claire Connolly, ‘The national tale’, in Peter Garside and Karen O'Brien (eds), The Oxford history of the novel in English; volume 2: English and British fiction, 1750–1820 (Oxford: Oxford University

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

fiction and drama’ (p. 57). 36 Benjamin Bird, ‘Treason and imagination: the anxiety of legitimacy in the subject of the 1760s’, Romanticism , 12:3 (2006), 192–3. Bird argues that what ‘particularly aroused Walpole’s wrath was a case of seditious libel brought by the crown against forty

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

the hero’s legitimacy has consequences: Enrico discovers Laurette is also legitimate and was orphaned when the Marchese killed her father to steal her inheritance; the money that Enrico inherits is rightfully Laurette’s. Enrico conceals from Laurette the murder of her father by his and the novel ends with their wedding. Such a conclusion effectively negates the potential implications of Enrico

in Gothic incest
Eric Pudney

-witchcraft, the ascription of supernatural power to the rightful monarch – James himself. Following his marriage, James insisted on an elaborate coronation ceremony, complete with the anointing of Anne, in the face of opposition from much of the Protestant clergy, who regarded this as superstition. As Normand and Roberts point out, [m]onarchy here uses the resources of theatre – ceremony, costume, action, words – to perform its power and demonstrate its legitimacy, but it is not theatre as illusion. The theatrical elements of the ceremony perform a kind of royal magic. The

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Eric Pudney

traditionally seen prophecy as an opportunity. From Henry VII onwards, the Tudors made use of sibylline prophecy in order to support their legitimacy, and to justify some of their more controversial decisions, including Henry VIII’s break with Rome.100 As Jessica Malay has pointed out, Elizabeth herself was depicted as a wise sibyl in poetry in the 1580s.101 This might explain the apparent interest in, and sympathy 97 Harvey, sig. A3r. 98 Harvey, sig. A4r. 99 On the threat of prophecy in general in Elizabeth’s reign, see Tim Thornton, Prophecy, Politics and the People in

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681