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Southern worlds, globes, and spheres
Sarah Comyn and Porscha Fermanis

through colonial relations’ also finds expression in an ongoing distrust among Indigenous studies scholars towards literary criticism and theory. 44 Literature, as the Goori poet and scholar Evelyn Araluen argues, ‘is a term we apply to the textual products of the West, or those texts that reinforce accepted narratives of the other’, while literary theory is either ‘unconcerned with our material realities and processes of cultural production, or it has seized upon our creations for its tropes and metaphors’. 45 If for postcolonial scholars such as Gayatri Spivak

in Worlding the south
Andrew Bowie

individuality. Despite these difficulties, Benjamin’s account of endless reflection can be productively linked to both a theory of the work of art and a theory of language which point forward to many of the issues of contemporary literary theory. Benjamin’s account comes close to Schelling’s contention that artworks can be endlessly interpreted ‘as if they contained an infinity of intentions, whereby one can never say whether this infinity lay in the artist himself or just in the work of art’ (Schelling I/3 p. 620). The similarity is a result of the fact that in both artworks are

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Art and interpretation
Andrew Bowie

contemporary literary theory, in which the boundaries between linguistic communities become uncrossable. One of the most productive aspects of Schleiermacher’s work is its rejection of naive versions of relativism and its insistence on truth and objectivity. At the same time, he gives full weight to the fact that the problems involved both in communication within languages and translation between them deeply affect the nature of the philosophical enterprise, rendering it inherently impossible to complete in the manner demanded by traditional metaphysics. Although he is

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Fichte, Hölderlin and Novalis
Andrew Bowie

. However, like so many of his contemporaries, he did not regard the boundaries between forms of theoretical and creative activity as fixed, and his philosophy is an integral part of a wider project which includes scientific and literary work. One of the main reasons why Novalis has become the focus of recent attention is that he asks questions about subjectivity which already involve issues relating to the ‘subversion of the subject’ which has become the theme of so much recent theoretical discussion. Claims in certain areas of contemporary European philosophy and literary

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Disability in working-class coalfields literature
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

methods of the literary and cultural critic, especially those literary theories developed by disability scholars. We show that while it has been overlooked in literary studies of working-class industrial literature, disability is in fact central to some of the most iconic works of this period. Working-class writing 1900–48: a brief literary history This book as a whole covers the period from 1880 to 1948. Late Victorian coalfields literature is fascinating in its own right and we explore some of the representations of disability found in nineteenth-century writing in

in Disability in industrial Britain
Open Access (free)
The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes
Heather Blatt

Espin Aarseth, ‘Nonlinearity and literary theory’, in George Landow, ed., Hyper/text/theory (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994), 51–86, at 66. Aarseth’s work on ergodic literature, within which he includes nonlinear texts, continues to be influential in the field: also see Cybertext. 37 Such a treatment seems to anticipate the fate of hypertext fiction today, as the taxing effort required to read and assemble narrative has been one of the reasons attributed to the genre’s failure to gain wide readership. See, for example, Benjamin Paloff, ‘Digital

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

analyses of literature, see Fiona Tolan, ‘Feminisms’, in Patricia Waugh (ed.), Literary Theory and Criticism: An Oxford Guide (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), pp. 319–39. 21 As Shelley’s Matilda meets her father as a teenager after being raised by an aunt, the depiction does not fit Freud

in Gothic incest