Search results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 46 items for :

  • "sovereignty" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

society. 8 Charles Alexandrowicz has argued that the shrinking of international society’s scope to ‘Eurocentrism’ was due to the switch from natural law, which was universal, to positivism, with its emphasis on treaty law, sovereignty, international personality and recognition (as constitutive of statehood) confined to the so-called ‘civilized states’ as original members of the ‘family of nations’. 9 This is arguable, for many nineteenth century jurists

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Virtuousness, virtuality and virtuosity in NATO’s representation of the Kosovo campaign
Andreas Behnke

realm. For the purpose of this essay, anarchy is understood as the absence of the very possibility of settling the question of a state’s identity beyond its sovereignty. More specifically, while constructivists emphatically assert the prepolitical identity of democracies and authoritarian regimes, the poststructuralist-informed approach, embraced in this essay, holds that the decision about

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
A dialogue with Islam as a pattern of conflict resolution and a security approach vis-à-vis Islamism
Bassam Tibi

process as based on mutual acceptance in terms of each ‘acknowledging the other’s nationhood’, as Herbert Kelman of Harvard, a mediator in the peace process, has put it ( 1992 : 18–38). In this regard we need to ask whether, and in a commitment to peace, the Islamists acknowledge the place of Israel in the Middle East 18 and the right of the Jewish people to sovereignty over the grounds of

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Heikki Patomäki

he was ready to make compromises towards meeting the US demands for full and absolute sovereignty, reverence for its power and respect for its national interest, he could not accept the total denial of the principle of the equality of states. 15 Nor could he accept the way the US chose to violate international law as it wished. At the very end of his term, in autumn 1996, Boutros

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Maja Zehfuss

that something seemed amiss in the ethical discourse surrounding ‘Kosovo’. The way we are accustomed to speak about such crises revolves around the issues of human rights, sovereignty and war; and that way of speaking (re)produces the exclusion it seeks to remedy. NATO and Western governments claimed to be acting out of responsibility for fellow humans. However, their conceptualisation of

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Language games in the Kosovo war
Mika Aaltola

overnight. The NATO-led military operation against Yugoslavia had to be based on broad popular support, which required careful preparation. For one thing, the existing gallery of Western political images had to be rearranged and even transformed so as to avoid the need for a United Nations Security Council mandate which would legitimise the military intervention and overcome the barriers of sovereignty and

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Redefining security in the Middle East
Tami Amanda Jacoby and Brent E. Sasley

’s relations with Syria, Lebanon, Jordan (until 1994) and Egypt (until 1979) were partly conditional on the resolution of where the border between the countries would fall. A 1975 Brookings Institution report on the prospects of peace in the region reiterated this focus on sovereignty, territorial integrity and secure borders – all realist notions – while neglecting other facets of security. Security studies

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Open Access (free)
Security/ Mobility and politics of movement
Marie Beauchamps, Marijn Hoijtink, Matthias Leese, Bruno Magalhães, and Sharon Weinblum

. Contrary to the literature that examines borders as dislocated sites of control, the chapter instead directs attention to the regulation of migrations through very classical discursive frameworks: as tools of ordering, controlling, and physical enactment of statecraft and sovereignty. Stef Wittendorp ( Chapter 8 ) examines from a discourse perspective the debate on the abolition of border controls in the

in Security/ Mobility
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Senator Henry Teller, who proposed a self-denying ordinance: the US would disclaim any ‘intention to exercise sovereignty’ over the island (the Teller Amendment). Congress empowered the President (20 April 1898), with 42 to 35 votes in the Senate and 310 to 6 in the House, to make the people of Cuba ‘free and independent’ and to utilize the armed forces in order to do so. Spain, upon hearing of the resolution, declared war (24 April 1898); Congress followed

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Civilisation, civil society and the Kosovo war
Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen

introduction to the concept of governmentality, see Mitchell Dean, Governmentality. Power and Rule in Modern Society (London, Sage, 1999). Within IR, Michael Dillon has used ‘governmentality’ to explore questions of world order. See Michael Dillon, ‘Sovereignty and Governmentality: From the Problematics of the “New World Order” to the Ethical Problematic of the World Order

in Mapping European security after Kosovo