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Achievement and self-doubt

derision’ marked by a snort, a wink and a grin at the latest fashionable developments. He tried to celebrate his election to the British Academy with a lunch in the almost empty Lancashire Cricket Club restaurant with a scholarly old friend; refused entry for not being members, they celebrated instead with slices of Grosvenor pie and paper cups of coffee from a more plebeian stall on the Old Trafford ground. Reginald Dodwell, the art historian and Director of the Whitworth Art Gallery, was a student of medieval illuminated manuscripts, a ‘historian-palaeographer’ who

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
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Golf comes to America

. Wilson ( 1925 ) of Merion Cricket Club in Pennsylvania took up this very cause. “There have been great difficulties in applying chemicals on golf courses,” he wrote, “owing to the fact that either a hand pump had to be employed or else some larger and expensive spraying machine used” (Wilson, 1925 : 33). Here Wilson is in almost direct conversation with Hansen. Importantly, however, he then described a ‘proportioning machine’ that allowed a green to be sprayed with a chemical solution in a matter of 15

in The greening of golf

pesticides remained crucial in sustaining established standards of living, Foy also named Rachel Carson specifically in noting the rising fear over ‘uncontrolled’ chemical uses. The best response in turn was IPM – a systematic way of confronting pest concerns, and one successfully deployed at Sea Island Golf Club in the state of Georgia to cope with a longstanding mole cricket problem. Sea Island, in other words, bridged the gap between IPM theory and practice. Further to the south, in 1995 the course

in The greening of golf
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-soaked conditions) were enjoying athletics and cricket in the camp three days later. 49 Spirits rose on 23 February when the first reinforcements from India arrived, including the 15th Hussars, 2/60th Rifles and the 92nd (Gordon) Highlanders (all veterans of the Second Afghan War), a Naval Brigade from HMS Dido and HMS Boadicea , and some drafts for units already based at Mount Prospect. As Colley pondered

in The Victorian soldier in Africa

of it. Based at Korosko for ten months, the Highlanders spent the summer building mud huts, playing games of cricket and football, and rowing on the river. They enjoyed fresh bread and fresh meat ‘in abundance’, formed their own theatrical company and enjoyed cordial relations with the natives, many of whom liked the bagpipes, even if soldiers were banned from entering any native village. 95 In October 1885

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples

conviction that he was about God’s purposes, arising out of his belief in a God who was holy, righteous and active in a world corrupted by sin. 14 Moody’s faith was the mainspring of his life. If C. L. R. James’s values stemmed from the ethos of the public school and the manners of the cricket field, then Moody certainly could recognise the influence of the former. However, much more enduring for him was

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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, 24 April 1994. 76 V. S. Naipaul, ‘Cricket’ (1963), in Overcrowded Barracoon , p. 23. 77 V. S. Naipaul, A Way in the World: a novel (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994), pp. 109–10. The novel was subtitled A

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Fetters of an American farmgirl

was then . . . to drive the cows to pasture . . . Upon her return she was allowed to eat . . . a bowl of skimmed milk, with brown bread crusts, which she was told to eat standing . . . she was placed on a cricket to wash the common dishes. . . she was to be in waiting to bring wood and chips, to run hither and thither . . . A large amount of dish-washing for small hands followed dinner. Then the same after tea and going after the cows finished her day’s work. The same routine followed day after day, with slight variations; adding a little more work and spicing the

in Special relationships

local produce. Toland was not then coy about the material benefits of mixing with the ruling gentry. Aristocratic houses, public walks and private entertainments were natural haunts, where he got his business done. Although solitary at times – walking in the long groves at Woodcote conversing with himself, or at Box Hill ‘that temple of nature’ – or in more sociable company ‘angling for trouts at Leatherhead, watching ‘contending villagers’ play cricket, following the hounds or racing horses, Toland participated in a variety of companionable forms of elite life

in Republican learning
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Class cultures, the trade unions and the Labour Party

, contributed ‘nothing’ to wealth production. Pilfering was ‘intrinsic to factory culture’ and seen as legitimate. Long memories of real or imagined grievances hung over ‘many industries’. Though a sense of historical grievance underpinned the Labour Party itself, grievances did not always translate into a political affirmation of working-class interests. The working class was accustomed to being talked down to. Though sports’ mad, it allowed almost all sporting bodies to be run by a self-selecting, allmale, upper and upper-middle-class clique (cricket, racing, rugby union

in Interpreting the Labour Party