Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

. Although this psychological model of child development was presented as comprehensive and harmonious, it was, in fact, glossing over a number of contentious and problematic issues concerning child rights. Wider child health and education legislation was seriously affecting the direction that any psychological research could take. The concept of ‘mental deficiency’ served as a

in The metamorphosis of autism
Stephen J. Kunitz

exposition, I shall deal only with policy changes in the United States since the late nineteenth century. American Indians and African Americans Because much has been written about the consequences of slavery and continuing discrimination for the health of African Americans, this chapter deals with Bayly 06_Tonra 01 21/06/2011 10:23 Page 147 Healthcare policy for American Indians since the early twentieth century a smaller minority group in the United States, namely American Indians and Alaska Natives. There are, however, some illuminating similarities and differences

in History, historians and development policy
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

physical, mental and spiritual health, in conjunction with health education advice to follow balanced diets, drink less and exercise more, were increasingly advocated – and purchased – as part of a healthy lifestyle: improving balance through movement and manipulation was thought to release energy, enhance resilience, promote endurance and productivity, combat obesity and increase a sense of ‘wellness’. 27 Balance also figured strongly in treatments of mental illness. From the 1920s

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

turned to restrictions on abortion, and argued that ‘legally coercing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term is not only an abuse of her basic human rights, but may also be extremely damaging from a mental health perspective.’15 The use of the adverb ‘legally’ is interesting for my purposes, because it identifies the perpetrator as the state, through its laws and policies. Restrictions on abortion might also have physical effects, especially when a woman decides to undergo ‘unsafe abortions,’ an expression which includes procedures carried out below the minimum

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Bonnie Evans

about the way to collect and employ scientific data when making claims about children’s early development. As discussed in Chapter 1 , the first autism was adopted into psychological theory in Britain primarily via major mental health institutions, child guidance clinics and progressive and permissive schools. It was not integrated via the

in The metamorphosis of autism
Colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40
Linda Bryder

culture; this comprised an understanding of health and wellbeing which included not only physical and mental health but also spiritual health.66 She recounted how Māori were widely debating the ‘effects of European civilisation’, noting that ‘Even in the most Europeanised families there lurks a secret attachment for those dear old customs, which are the result of so many centuries of experience, and [significantly] no doubt contain many things worth keeping’ [my emphasis]. She advised, ‘Such customs (ancestral), having kept the Maori race in vigorous health for many

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Teaching ‘relaxed living’ in post-war Britain
Ayesha Nathoo

Introduction In 1968, a short Disney film, Understanding Stresses and Strains , narrated by actor, writer and director Lawrence Dobkin, opened with the following statement: A modern concept of well-balanced health may be visualised as an equilateral triangle composed of a physical side, a mental side and a social side, each of equal importance. This is a soundly based concept and those who live within it, keeping all sides in

in Balancing the self
M. Anne Brown

poverty, poor environmental health and mental distress, a high death rate for infants and small children, and appallingly high rates of suicide, violence and substance abuse. As will become clear, patterns of ill-health lock into the struggles around land rights. At a concrete level, however, almost all Indigenous Australians, including those who live beyond the immediate scope of land rights, are affected by high levels of disease. Questions of Aboriginal health often have a curious status. The linkage between Aboriginal ill-health and what could

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
Melissa Dickson, Emilie Taylor-Brown and Sally Shuttleworth

anxieties about mental and physical ailments arising from the general pressures of modern life were not unique to America, or to Britain, in the nineteenth century, but engendered concern across national boundaries and cultures. Central to this study is the question of how self-referential concepts of ‘the modern’ worked to structure perceptions of health, disease, and medical treatment in the long nineteenth century. Neurasthenia was not the only disease constituted in relation to problems of modernity or to national character. Similar claims were, as our volume

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

-specific’ legislation to be passed in the UK, demonstrating the significance of the autism diagnosis to reframing approaches to mental health care, social welfare provision and individual rights in the UK. In 2013, EU Aims, a major initiative to develop new treatments for autism, received the largest grant for any mental health problem in the whole of Europe, revealing the cultural capital and potential for revenue

in The metamorphosis of autism