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Different voices, voicing difference
Gilli Bush-Bailey

voice in her autobiographical writing, newspaper interviews, contracts and correspondence preserved in the BBC’s written archives, this chapter attends to the shifting register of her voice as the wronged writer negotiating a better fee or doggedly chasing up her copyright. In her many letters to the Authors’ Society (held by the British Library), she asks for legal advice and representation against unscrupulous publishers, while simultaneously attempting to get around paying fees for membership of the organisation that she wishes to act on her behalf. As a co

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Northern Irish fiction after the Troubles
Neal Alexander

central to many novels of the post-Agreement period. In this regard, it is worth noting that three recent novels by established writers are each set at a significant historical remove from the North’s current interregnum. Bernard McLaverty’s The Anatomy School (2001) is a semi-autobiographical novel of Northern Catholic adolescence and sexual awakening against the backdrop of late 1960s Belfast; Eoin McNamee’s The Blue Tango (2001) reconstructs the circumstances surrounding the murder of Patricia Curran at Whiteabbey on 13 November 1952; and David Park’s The Big Snow

in Irish literature since 1990
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Christopher Morgan

matter of Thomas as a priest of the Church in Wales, an Anglican vicar ministering amongst a native community traditionally non conformist. Beneath the surface of these more obvious linguistic, political, and religious hauntings are still other tensions, less overt, more obscure and even obscured, but none the less central and potent. For example, the first prose-poem from his autobiographical collection The Echoes Return Slow (1988) describes, in a shocking way, what Thomas, at that time past seventy years old, imagines to have been the experience of his caesarean

in R. S. Thomas
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The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

to define the postcolonial nation from their perspective. Indeed, in the autobiographical Head Above Water (1986) she self-consciously situates herself as a ‘new [woman] of the new Africa’, more assertive, more complex (she claims) than her mothers, but still connected with the past, and situated within a family lineage of female storytellers.17 As with Stead and Schreiner, therefore, Emecheta’s method might be characterised as broadly ‘temporal/territorial’ according to the definitions set out in the previous chapter, but also as (auto)biographical, in so far as her

in Stories of women
Howard Caygill

definitive version under the title ‘Levant’ appearing in the 1942 edition. Before this it appeared under the title ‘Mist’, which was itself a revision, in 1919, of a rather different poem ‘The Supplicants’ published in the Florentine journal Lacerba in 1915 and absent from Il porto sepolto. The final version is the outcome of a sustained process of distillation that, beginning with an inelegant autobiographical account of a voyage shared with emigrants, was transformed into a magnificent meditation upon migration, death and commemoration. ‘Levant’ is structured in terms of

in The new aestheticism
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Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

condition of the hysteric, Friday scarred, marked, excluded, remarked upon, has as his sole mode of expression a body language (rather than his body itself). Muted by his oppressors, Friday’s dumb mutilation has now become its own sign: ‘the home of Friday is not a place of words’ (Foe 157). Friday blots Foe’s (or Defoe’s, or Susan’s) ‘I’ of autobiographical narrative with his own zero, his open empty mouth; he crosses the ‘I’ with a nought – but a nought can also be read as a full circle. Till the unspoken is spoken, the character Foe observes, we cannot come to the

in Stories of women
The paradoxes of sustainability and Michel Houellebecq’s The Possibility of an Island
Hannes Bergthaller

like his earlier novels, it features a fish-eyed vision of the psychological devastation wrought by consumer capitalism, graphic but disturbingly affectless sex scenes, dollops of philosophical and sociological speculation, and a deeply misanthropic protagonist resembling the author’s own public persona. It also expands on and modifies the transhumanist theme Houellebecq had already introduced in Atomized (2000 [1998]). The plot of The Possibility of an Island alternates between the autobiographical account of Daniel1, which constitutes the bulk of the narrative, and

in Literature and sustainability
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Sibylle Lacan’s Un père: puzzle
Elizabeth Fallaize

the daughter merely confirming the law of the father? This intriguing text tables issues relating to autobiographical writing, to discourses of fatherhood and daughterhood and to the ways in which women’s writing can be appropriated – or legitimised – by the dominant theoretical discourses of its day. I intend to consider these issues in three different stages of this chapter: first, what kind of writing project is entailed? Second, how does it explore and engage with discourses of the daughter–father relation? And third, can the text be reduced simply to a reading in

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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Blasons d’un corps masculin, L’Ecrivaillon and La Ligne âpre by Régine Detambel
Marie-Claire Barnet

, p. , for the autobiographical dimension of this quotation.  Michel de Montaigne, Essais (Paris: Gallimard, Folio, ), p. . See Louis Marin, La Voix excommuniée (Paris: Galilée, ), p. .  See Susan Bordo, Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and the Body (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, ).  Roland Barthes, S/Z (Paris: Seuil, ), pp. –. My thanks to Elza Adamowicz for reminding me of this passage.  Letter from Detambel to the author,  November .  François Dagognet, La Peau découverte (Le

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Christopher Morgan

short and somewhat inconspicuous ‘No’. For Thomas poetry seems frequently to be the product of an interior pain, a sustained wound, a deep sense of grief over the broken condition of humankind and its inability to heal itself. The first prose sequence in the autobiographical collection The Echoes Return Slow (1988), examined briefly in the Introduction, traces this sense of the wound to the remembered moment of birth: Time would have its work cut out in smoothing the birth-marks in the flesh. The marks in the spirit would not heal. The dream would recur, groping his

in R. S. Thomas