work by aid agencies and their close relationship with journalists. Simon Cottle and David Nolan claim that, ‘These developments imperil the very ethics and project of global humanitarianism that aid agencies historically have done so much to promote’. 10 Glenda Cooper also questions the editorial integrity of journalists working with aid agencies: ‘While journalists – if sometimes imperfectly – work on the principle of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister

Brazilian diplomat. As we began discussing international affairs and strategy, Amorim’s speech assumed a calm, professorial cadence. ‘Global disorder’ undermines international cooperation, he suggested soberly. And there is a need to rescue human rights discourse, despite the hypocrisy and selectivity of its liberal proponents. Amorim leant forward when I brought up Brazil’s recent withdrawal from the world stage. As foreign minister throughout the two presidential terms of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, from 2003 to 2011, he guided Brazil to a position of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

engagement tool in SfD work across the global South (Armstrong, 2004 ; Spaaij, 2012 ). Zambian SfD practitioners interviewed by Njelesani et al . ( 2014 : 798) described this sport as being associated with and ‘generat[ing] a sense of belonging, collectivity, and identity in Zambian culture’. Although these interviewees recognized the colonial history to which Hartmann and Kwauk ( 2011 ) refer, it was this contemporary, localized cultural perspective that had been

in Localizing global sport for development
The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s

of its glamour rub off on them . The Beautiful Americans The previous section established the extent of the Peace Corps’ publicity, but what messages did it convey? Despite its global vision, Peace Corps publicity was overwhelmingly focused on America. In publicity, the Peace Corps was framed as an expression of American goodwill, and Peace Corps volunteers as the

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
The management of migration between care and control

. 2 S. Castles and M. J. Miller , The Age of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World ( Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan , 2009 ); K. Moore , B. Gross and T. R. Threadgold (eds), Migrations and the Media: Global Crises and the Media ( New York : Peter Lang , 2012 ). 3

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Offline and online games, branding and humanitarianism at the Roskilde Festival

. Roskilde Festival is the largest North European culture and music festival and is held each summer in the outskirts of the city of Roskilde, which is ca. 30km from the capital city of Denmark, Copenhagen. The festival prides itself on its non-profit status and its commitment to sustainability and global solidarity. In this chapter we focus on Hummel, one of the festival’s many corporate sponsors and a

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s

new era of global humanitarianism. Raymond Williams described ‘structures of feeling’ as ‘affective elements of consciousness and relationships: not feeling against thought, but thought as felt and feeling as thought: practical consciousness of a present kind, in a living and interrelating community’. 4 A humanitarian ‘structure of feeling’ crystallises around an affective beholding of a group of displaced and dispossessed

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
The Marshall Plan films about Greece

A growing number of studies have argued for a historical and historicised understanding of global humanitarianism and humanitarian intervention. 1 However, the history of the interdependence of humanitarianism with media campaigns and the wider visual culture of each period remains an underexplored field, as the few studies in this area highlight. 2 The Marshall Plan films stand for a landmark

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Their lives and social contexts

knowledge and perspectives is central to the overall methodological approach within the book. From the outset of our research in Zambia we have been conscious that Northern researchers in SfD are too often required to conduct their enquiries with only limited understandings of local and country-specific social and cultural contexts; although they may be well equipped with expert knowledge of development challenges from a global perspective, they may have

in Localizing global sport for development
Cinema, news media and perception management of the Gaza conflicts

is simply ‘responding’. A huge part of Israel’s perception management during the 2014 conflict was to conflate Hamas with the global threat of radical Islam, whilst presenting Israel as part of the democratic world from which Hamas is excluded, although Hamas itself was democratically elected. As John Berger remarks in another context, a sure-fire way to discredit and eradicate your opposition is ‘by calling

in Global humanitarianism and media culture