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. Some of the other cable channels will however take more chances to get attention, which means that there is a relatively open market, even though the viewing numbers at these stations can be small. Cable is the best place to work, if you want to get beyond the boundaries of present behaviour. In relation to personal experiences with CARA Stone: If you are interested in filmmaking and narrative-​making as I am, I have never sought to shock as much as to ask the viewer to consider an alternative –​as with the JFK assassination. I have included sex in all of the movies

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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An allegory of imperial rapport

circulating icons clearly enhance the soft power of monarchy. Within this landscape, films about royals also have their role to play. Two major commercial releases of the years 2000 map this change in opinion in Britain and Australia, and stand out as contemporary narrative explorations of the legitimacy of the British monarchy: The Queen (Stephen Frears, 2006) and The King’s Speech (Tom Hooper, 2010

in The British monarchy on screen
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The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva

twentieth century. Discussing Elizabeth I as an early modern political media diva may seem preposterous, and yet our claim is that she anticipates the very enmeshment between celebrity culture and political power that is so particular to the charisma of celebrities in the public arena in the twentieth and early twenty-first century. What is at stake in our discussion is, therefore, a self-consciously ahistorical reading

in The British monarchy on screen
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The King’s Speech as melodrama

to the bloody thing and stare it square in the eye, as would any decent Englishman. Show who’s in command.’ Then, condemning Bertie’s socialite brother David, the future Edward VIII (Guy Pearce), and his scandalous relationship with the American divorcée Wallis Simpson (Eve Best), he sternly predicts (in a way typical of the contemporary monarchy biopic’s self-reflexivity about narratives of history

in The British monarchy on screen
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs

concerns the nature of the portrayal of the British monarchy for contemporary audiences. In particular, depictions of monarchs from different historical periods demonstrate changes in the nature of royal power and authority. These changes can be seen in the differing degrees of narrative agency afforded to different monarchs, and in the representation of the monarch as national figurehead, the spectacle of

in The British monarchy on screen
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nation’s cultural influence, what relation does this ‘soft power’ 1 have to the harder version personified by the muscular Bond? What connection does this charmingly self-mocking monarch have with the purviews of British intelligence, or indeed the other institutions represented by the London landmarks over which her helicopter flew – parliament, the established church, and the punitive power of the state? How have film and television, British and

in The British monarchy on screen
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The Queen in Australia

Continuing to hold colonial possessions, and administering populations of dispossessed and disenfranchised peoples within colonial settler nations under race-based and discriminatory regulation, were areas of vulnerability in the Western alliance’s self-presentation as the lands of the free. Evidence for this claim abounds in the records of the Australian Department of Territories, where policy delays and missteps

in The British monarchy on screen

melodrama attempting to replace this generic heroine with the living monarch, it was initially devised as a docudrama, with that form’s fidelity to actual events and the employment of both television and press quotation. Real and simulated footage from British newscasts is interspersed with a fictional narrative of both the royal family and the Labour government’s response to Diana’s death. Written by Peter Morgan

in The British monarchy on screen
Screening Victoria

Smith contends that ‘The stories that Americans tell and have told about presidents’ have played a critical part in forming how they think about their elected heads of state. 18 As noted above, Britain’s monarchs mostly appear in historical narratives, often described as period or costume dramas, one of the most popular of fictional genres. 19 Some cultural theorists believe

in The British monarchy on screen

quasi-religiously adored virgin Queen Bess’. 21 Elizabeth is memorialised on screen as a queen who placed the needs of her nation above her sexual and reproductive desires, sac-rificing ‘the “natural” destiny of a woman, marriage and children, trading personal happiness for public power’. 22 Her self-negation is linked to a glorious reign ‘of imperial and creative supremacy’ 23 in films such as Fire

in The British monarchy on screen