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institutional vacuum in the post-Soviet geopolitical space has both contributed to such problems and impeded their successful resolution. The post-Soviet states have been forced to rebuild themselves by establishing basic institutions of governance and administration. At the same time the massive legitimacy problems they face call for nation building, along either inclusive/ civic or exclusive/ethnic lines. Moreover, the post-Soviet transition is further complicated by its taking place in the context of globalisation and as such is marked by heightened economic

in Limiting institutions?
The Member States between procedural adaptation and structural revolution

2444Ch18 3/12/02 18 2:07 pm Page 413 Jürgen Mittag and Wolfgang Wessels The ‘One’ and the ‘Fifteen’? The Member States between procedural adaptation and structural revolution Does the EU matter? Fundamentals before and after Maastricht The growth and differentiation of the institutional and procedural system of the European Union has created considerable challenges for all Member States.1 The very nature of the process of European integration is a continuing pooling of sovereignty, and a transfer of responsibilities and authorities, which has enlarged the

in Fifteen into one?
Open Access (free)
War economies, peace economies and transformation

transformation projects. Further, in order to move towards a peace economy, one must also conceive of peace in a much broader sense, one that goes beyond concerns 5 4062 building a peace economy_2652Prelims 25/11/2013 15:06 Page 6 Building a peace economy? regarding overt physical violence. If one judges peace also in terms of the prevalence and role of structural violence (Galtung, 1969) at both local and international levels, the task of creating a peace economy becomes a much wider and more substantial project. Eradicating direct or personal violence, the physical acts of

in Building a peace economy?
The nature of the development-security industry

. Likewise, wider unresolved geopolitical disputes may be brushed aside with post-conflict programming being implemented regardless. Depoliticisation is a useful political strategy for the DSI on several fronts. First, the removal of politics serves to legitimise the failure of actors to intervene politically or militarily. Portraying conflict as apolitical, or as primarily a development problem, allows actors to excuse themselves from actively engaging or working towards more political solutions (described in greater detail in forthcoming sections). Linked to this, as aid

in Building a peace economy?
Sustainability in Kim Stanley Robinson’s Science in the Capital trilogy

2007b: 92). Conceptualising society in terms of these three pillars characterises it as a non-linear dynamic feedback system, a structure that draws on complexity theory and which Robinson aligns with the structural comedy. The trilogy is able to explore the relationships between ecological systems, climate change and climate mitigation by hybridising sf with the structural comedy to portray a fictional future in all its socio-political complexity. In a series of blog posts that Chase addresses to the American people, he frames this movement towards sustainability as

in Literature and sustainability
Open Access (free)
Potentials of disorder in the Caucasus and Yugoslavia

socialist empires forced the societies of the post-socialist spaces to redefine the most basic institutions that govern social life. They had, in short, to embark upon a process of competitive and contested polity building. All the societies of the collapsed empires faced this challenge. Not all societies, however, managed to find a non-violent solution. Those administrative units of the collapsing empires with a multi-ethnical population faced particular problems: the ambitions and fears of two or more ethnic groups had to be O 1 Jan Koehler and Christoph Zürcher

in Potentials of disorder
Open Access (free)
Passion and politics

narrate their decision to join the EDL in terms of their experience of, or resistance to, injustice. However, post-hoc narrations cannot be equated with motivations for participation, and the emphasis on a life-changing moment in charting paths into the movement is not an accurate reflection of the longer and more multi-factorial process of joining the EDL encountered in this study. Thus, it is concluded, there is not one ‘type’ of person that is attracted to a movement like the EDL; rather decisions to start, continue and draw back from activism are set within a

in Loud and proud
Open Access (free)
The emergence of a new major actor in the European arena

and productive structures and enhancing the regionally balanced economic development was the focus of attention prior to the adoption of the TEU. Spain traditionally adopted a very integrationist negotiating stance and tried to cope with the requirements imposed during the long transitional period leading to its full participation in all Community policies.11 Obviously, all matters related to the definition of a regional development policy at the European level, as well as the subsequent management of the Structural Funds, concentrated Spain’s political priorities

in Fifteen into one?
Open Access (free)
One way to Europeanisation

-profile European policy. Deeply concerned with the economic impact of integration and with the negotiations of the Structural Funds (Delors Packages I and II), the government had a very cautious position towards the development of political union. This is clearly demonstrated by the positions adopted at the 1991 IGC. While favouring the single currency and economic and social cohesion, the Portuguese government opposed the inclusion of any kind of federal commitment and was not very supportive to the establishment of a CFSP, especially its security and defence dimensions. At

in Fifteen into one?
Open Access (free)

the part of Donald Davidson and others towards holistic accounts of meaning, and the orientation in post-structuralism towards the undecidable aspects of interpretation all involve structures of thought which developed as part of the history of aesthetics. While some of these thinkers explicitly refer to the tradition to be examined in the present book, others have been notably unconcerned about many of their most significant precursors. In order to help overcome this underestimation of the role of aesthetics the present book will focus on some of the main accounts

in Aesthetics and subjectivity