Search results

Open Access (free)

they be pushed to the sidelines in our exploration of early modern catholicism, for if the religion of ordinary men was eclectic, lively and significant, so too were the careers and experiences of their bishops. This is nowhere more apparent than in the lives of those who made up the seventeenth-century French episcopate, one of the major elites of Bourbon France. While other social and religious groups, like the nobility and the Jansenists, have not lacked efforts to reconstruct their identities, mentalities and ideals,9 historians have rarely considered the

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)
Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic

of this book, intervening in debates about modernity is another. Gilroy challenges Marxist, economic and philosophical accounts of the development of modernity as a selfcontained European process, based on principles and practices of rationality, economic productivism, Enlightenment egalitarianism and wage labour. Slavery, he argues, was fundamental to modernity; racial terror lies within its heart. Gilroy’s concern with the racial terror of slavery chimes with a burgeoning academic interest in the experience of Jews under Nazism (the emergent ‘Holocaust studies

in Postcolonial contraventions
Acceptance, critique and the bigger picture

notion that work–earn–spend lifestyles are indicative of progress and a high standard of living. In this, they share conclusions with an estimated fifty million people in the United States and other ‘developed’ countries, who contest the dominant models of wellbeing put forward by growth economics.3 The ideas and practices of this group receive little attention in the mainstream media, however. This chapter reflects on two qualitative research projects, carried out between 1999 and 2001, with people experiencing both ways of life. The discussion that follows examines

in The end of Irish history?
Open Access (free)
Contested categories

spiritual remedies as upon the power of witches, and upon the thin but critical line that separates the diabolic power from the divine. Although the broad contours of late-medieval learned conceptions of witchcraft were determined by basic metaphysical assumptions, the specific form these conceptions took was primarily the result of the evidence and experience available to various authors. In chapter 5 I take up the epistemological problems posed by belief in witchcraft. In the case of Institoris and Sprenger, their category “witch” responded to their experience as

in The Malleus Maleficarum and the construction of witchcraft
Open Access (free)

judgement on spiritual matters, and no member of the laity could attempt to judge Catholic doctrines. More particularly, this was an assertion of their rights, based on the notion of episcopal leadership. As bishops, they were obligated to ensure that the church’s unique role as the definer of faith was protected. In neither case, however, did the bishops expressly raise the question of their specific role in judging matters of faith. It would not be until the 1650s, in the Formulary crisis, that they would need publicly and explicitly to address that problem. These were

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)

position and experiences as the industrialisation thesis maintains, but it is not the only one. In going beyond the workplace and looking at ‘disabled’ Britons’ experiences in other areas of life during the Industrial Revolution, this book suggests how primarily economic meanings of disability could be mediated and challenged by, for example, disabled people’s domestic, spiritual and social lives. Indeed, those who witnessed the Industrial Revolution were far more con- Introduction 7 cerned about the impact it had on the bodies of workers than what it meant for

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
The discourse of spirits in Enlightenment Bristol

, were far from sceptical about the existence of spirits. Most of them at some stage tell Dyer of apparitions, dreams or other ‘spiritualexperiences, quite apart from their common interest in metaphysical schemes with a heavy role for an active spirit world.28 Not all of the clergy who attended, however, can be associated with Dyer’s outlook, one such exception being the Grammar School headmaster, later Rector of St Michael’s, Samuel Seyer, who ‘asked many questions in Greek and Latin’ on 10 February.29 His son and namesake, when he was collecting notes about the

in Beyond the witch trials
Open Access (free)
The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes

viewed as essential to understanding the text. According to the Orcherd, reading is most meaningful when it emerges from readers’ exercise of controlled agency, and the translator designed the structure of the text to elicit, guide, and limit that agency in order to direct his readers’ attention towards the goal of spiritual development. One consequence of such nonlinear reading in both medieval and digital media is its emphasis on individualized experiences. The choices readers pursue while navigating a work allow them to ‘make sense’ of their nonlinear experience

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

Somme) and of the ruin done to people and communities as the conflict passed over them and this affected him deeply: To have seen the physical suffering and the mental anguish caused to innocent people – civilians and soldiers alike – by Lord Roberts’ quack prescription labelled War – ‘the only natural tonic’; and to have witnessed the broken homes and blighted lives of those I have dwelt among during the past winter – is an experience both spiritual and physical, to which it is utterly beyond the compass of my vocabulary adequately to give expression.68 Bell wrote

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)

22/3/04 12:55 pm CONCLUSION Page 215 215 ambiguities of Tridentine government and hierarchy, the onerous complexities involved in devising appropriate theological and spiritual inspirations for their vocations, or the tensions between the sacred realm and a rising secular authority. The episcopate’s impressive ability, therefore, to devise and defend its ideology does not simply reveal the trials, failures and achievements of its personal experience but, more expansively, actually throws light on the growing pains of early modern catholicism. There was, of

in Fathers, pastors and kings