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Open Access (free)
Neil Macmaster

by settlers who were blindly intent on asserting their domination and on wrecking any chance of a peaceful inter-ethnic resolution to the deepening crisis of colonialism. After the brutal elimination of two of the five Reggui sons, the only daughter Zohra, with enormous courage, directly confronted Achiary about the fate of her brothers only to be arrested and shot in turn. Zohra Reggui was an exceptional young woman by the standards of provincial Algeria: highly educated and ‘westernised’, she did not wear the veil and personified the rare example of the

in Burning the veil
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

mythologies of Indian culture. As Parama Roy puts it: There is an ongoing and strenuous endeavour in the discourse of thuggee to interpellate the thug as an essence, a move which attests to the anxiety of rupture that subtends the totalizing epistemologies of colonialism. Yet the thug as discursive object is strikingly resistant to such

in The other empire
Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship
Charles V. Reed

brash proponent of such an outlook, argues for the modernising legacy of the British Empire against those who identify instead the ‘racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance’, all of which, he argues, ‘existed long before colonialism’. 23 British governance, Ferguson believes, brought great benefits, including ‘the English language’, ‘representative assemblies’, ‘the triumph

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

History of the British Empire, Companion series: Missions and Empire (Oxford, 2005); J. P. Daughton, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880–1914 (Oxford, 2006); Stewart J. Brown, Providence and Empire: Religion, Politics and Society in the United Kingdom 1815–1914 (London, 2008); Esther Breitenbach, Empire and Scottish Society: The Impact of Foreign Missions at Home, c. 1790–c.1914 (Edinburgh, 2009); Hilary M. Carey, God’s Empire: Religion and Colonialism in the British World, c. 1801–1908 (Cambridge, 2011). 44 Keith

in Population, providence and empire
Neil Macmaster

council’.35 The model commander of the Wilaya was a leader who should ensure that his soldiers ‘must always respect the people’, particularly as ‘an abject colonialism’ had kept them in ignorance and, ‘maraboutisme, for example, must be fought intelligently. It is stupid, even criminal, to treat people roughly’.36 An ALN report noted that the local five-man committees which it set up to run village life, the ‘People’s Assemblies’, tended to be based on the old djemâa and, as such, ‘are still composed of wealthy and elderly individuals’, or even of individuals ‘who in

in Burning the veil
Caroline Rusterholz

legacy of colonialism and the view held by BCIIC on the leading roles of its members in educating other countries. This form of knowledge transfer implies an assumption of superiority on the part of BCIIC members. Representatives of Japan, India, 8 China and Ceylon were present. Helena Wright opened the session on the practical problems of contraception in the East. Lord Horder, introducing her to the audience, emphasised her expertise in birth control in Britain but also stressed the fact that she had lived in China

in Women’s medicine
Matthew M. Heaton

. The medical justification for repatriating Nigerian mental patients was deeply rooted in ideological perspectives on the relationship between race, culture and human psychology that developed in the context of a European imperialism that sought to explain the power dynamics of Empire in scientific terms. 18 The literature on race and colonialism is abundant, and beyond the scope of this chapter, other

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

brooding over some terrible, unforgettable, wrong’ was the ‘terror of [her] life’; as if to punish the white child for the cruelties of colonialism she terrorises her with tales of soucriants, loups-garoux and zombies, introducing her to ‘a world of fear and distrust’, the ‘terrified consciousness’ which Ramchand identifies as central to the colonial subjectivity. 72 Rhys describes another black servant

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

decay he attributes to the proletarianisation that is at its most visible in the metropolis. It is perhaps for him an unmanageably diffuse area for fictional scrutiny. His most compelling meditation on decay is The Enigma of Arrival , a novel which Frank Kermode notes ‘is set in a part of rural England that doesn’t count racism or colonialism among its most pressing problems’. 68 As well as

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state
Anna Greenwood

–1970 , Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011 ; Deborah J. Neill, Networks in Tropical Medicine: Internationalism, Colonialism, and the Rise of a Medical Specialty, 1890–1930 , Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2012 37 David Hardiman (ed.), Healing Bodies, Saving Souls: Medical Missions in Asia and Africa , Amsterdam and

in Beyond the state