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  • Manchester History of Medicine x
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Christine E. Hallett

, ‘Sister’: 102. 47 G. A. Henty, The Collected Works of G. A. Henty, 7 vols (Alvin, TX: Halcyon Classics, 2011). On G.  A. Henty, see:  Mawuena Kossi Logan, Narrating Africa:  George Henty and the Fiction of Empire (London:  Taylor and Francis, 2007). 48 Eric Scott (ed.), Nobody Ever Wins a War: The World War I Diaries of Ella Mae Bongard, R.N. (Ottawa: Janeric Enterprises, 1997): 29. 49 Boylston, ‘Sister’: 173–4. 50 Christine E. Hallett, Veiled Warriors:  Allied Nurses of the First World War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014): Conclusion. 51 Philips, ‘Healthy

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

University Press, 1998). 53 Pattinson, Behind Enemy Lines. 54 Susan R. Grayzel, ‘“Fighting for the idea of home life”: Mrs Miniver and Anglo-­American representations of domestic morale’, in Philippa Levine and Susan R. Grayzel (eds), Gender, Labour, War and Empire (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). 55 Gail Braybon and Penny Summerfield, Out of the Cage: Women’s Experiences in Two World Wars (London: Pandora, 1987); Deborah Montgomerie, ‘Reassessing Rosie: World War II, New Zealand women and the iconography of femininity’, Gender and History 8, 1 (1996): 108–32; Phil

in Negotiating nursing
Bonnie Evans

everyday life and expression. A growing generation of grammar-school-educated critical thinkers was finally able to challenge the authority of traditional models of social progress and evolutionary development espoused by authorities such as Cyril Burt. On the international stage, the British Empire was in its death throes. Harold Macmillan’s ‘Winds of Change’ speech to the

in The metamorphosis of autism
Jane Brooks

treatment.46 Many of Hutchinson’s patients had sustained gunshot wounds to the abdomen and then had travelled by train through Italy to Naples before being admitted to her ward on HMS Empire Clyde: During these ­days – ­for days it ­was – ­rather than ­hours – ­some of them had not had their dressings (they had not got to the stage of bags yet) properly ­changed – ­just more padding added as the bandages became stained with faecal fluid. They bulged horrifically as if bearing a pillow over their abdomen. If the ship was in the Naples harbour they came direct to us

in Negotiating nursing
Jane Brooks

Susan R. Grayzel (eds), Gender, Labour, War and Empire (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), 145. 27 Rose, Which People’s War?, loc. 339. 28 P.M. Dyer, ‘When life was grey and scarlet: A recollection of life as an Army Nursing Sister’, 63, Museum of Military Medical (hereafter MMM) QARANC/PE/1/151/DYER Box 8. 29 Christine E. Hallett, Containing Trauma: Nursing Work in the First World War (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2009), 178. 30 Kirsty Harris, More than Bombs and Bandages: Australian Army Nurses at Work in World War I (Newport: Big Sky Publishing

in Negotiating nursing
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The French human sciences and the crafting of modern subjectivity, 1794–1816
Laurens Schlicht

Ibid. , 54. 89 M. Gourevitch, ‘La Psychiatrie sous l’empire’, Histoire des sciences medicales , 23:1 (1989), 27–32 (p. 31). 90 Tableau des opérations de l’Assemblée nationale d’après le Journal de Paris , 228

in Progress and pathology
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Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

IQs below 50, and later, in 1944, enabling the development of tests for eleven-year-olds and the establishment of the tripartite secondary school system covering grammar, secondary modern and technical schools. It also led to the establishment of an institutional empire built on measuring this newly discovered entity and added ‘intelligence’ to the tools of social-scientific researchers, who could

in The metamorphosis of autism
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Gareth Millward

virgin populations abroad. Although based in the US, Sabin had been born in the Russian Empire (in latter-day Poland) and his relationships with Soviet scientists helped him convince the Soviet Union to allow trials of his OPV. These were a success and, despite initial Western scepticism, by the early 1960s the potential advantages of OPV were recognised by the United States and its allies 88 As with IPV, the British medical establishment was initially cautious. 89 Experiments with Hilary Koprowski's OPV in Belfast in 1956 had been ‘disastrous’, as Lindner and Blume

in Vaccinating Britain
Martin D. Moore

foundations for expanded private involvement in service delivery, the government's rejection of charges and insurance options meant that the reforms respected two significant principles of the NHS: central funding by taxation and universal access – a core of the supposed ‘post-war consensus’ – remained intact. 58 Underpinning these changes, however, was an analysis consonant with contemporary neoliberal values. The introduction of stricter monitoring and accountability practices would prevent state-employed professionals from empire-building and direct

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
George Campbell Gosling

keen to follow the 1942 Beveridge Report in exploring the options for postwar social reconstruction. Beyond this, however, Labour's first majority government took Britain in a radical new direction. 6 Much of the empire was dismantled at an alarming pace while key industries including coal, steel, electricity and the railways were brought under state control. 7 Almost as an extension of this programme, Britain's entire hospital sector was nationalised. However

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48