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Representations of Irish political leaders in the ‘Haughey’ plays of Carr, Barry and Breen
Anthony Roche

urges Fermoy to withdraw by hinting at the dirt he will sell to the papers to tarnish his opponent, not least the fact that ‘there’s a few inquiries to be med as to how the cement and gravel empire goh off of the ground’ (p. 34). In the Act II interview, which confirms that Fermoy beat Hanafin, there’s the suggestion he did so by disclosing scandal about his opponent. Verona . . . didn’t you rise in proportion to Hanaffin’s fall? Fermoy A cuurse I did, but thah doesn’t diminish divine grace. If that scandal had broken a week laher, Hannafin would’ve kept hees seat

in Irish literature since 1990
Martine Pelletier

understanding’. Cracking the code ‘will reveal to you how a man thinks, what his character traits are, his loyalties, his vices, his entire intellectual architecture’. Fired up by his own dream of total control, he exclaims ‘If we could break into that vault, David, we wouldn’t control just an empire. We would rule the entire universe’. Here is the ultimate dream of power, and a reminder 9780719075636_4_006.qxd 114 16/2/09 9:25 AM Page 114 Drama that eugenics could prove dramatically attractive to dictatorial, racist regimes like Hitler’s Germany. It is an equally

in Irish literature since 1990
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New generation Northern Irish poets (Sinéad Morrissey and Nick Laird)
Michael Parker

between nineteenth-century, early twentieth-century and contemporary 9780719075636_4_010.qxd 190 16/2/09 9:26 AM Page 190 Poetry colonial adventurism; like Shelley’s ‘Ozymandias’,31 the poem invites us to reflect on the transience of empire and the monumental follies political leaders continue to commit. At the same time, it should be added that Laird’s perspective is itself ineluctably ‘compromised’ since it regards the east through western eyes.32 Its first two parts portray the working practices of the archaeologist Sir Austin Henry Layard (1817–94), whose

in Irish literature since 1990
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Elleke Boehmer

, NC: Duke University Press, forthcoming). I am grateful to Susan Andrade for sending me drafts of her book chapters and for our continuing conversation on gender and the nation. Jameson, ‘Third-world literature in the era of multinational capitalism’, p. 96; see also Lazarus, ‘Fredric Jameson on “third-world literature”’. On the Indian postcolonial novel in English as a nation metaphor, see also Amit Chaudhuri, ‘Forms of renewal’, TLS, 5262 (6 February 2004), 13. Anderson, Imagined Communities, pp. 26–34. Louise Yelin, From the Margins of Empire: Christina Stead

in Stories of women
Gender and nationalism in the early fiction of Flora Nwapa
Elleke Boehmer

the alienated, selfhating colonised in Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks [1952], trans. C. L. Markmann (London: Pluto Press, 1970), or Jean-Paul Sartre, Black Orpheus [1948], trans. S. W. Allen (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1976). On Indian effeminisation and the countering force of ‘hyper-masculinity’ under empire, see Ashis Nandy’s groundbreaking The Intimate Enemy: Loss and Recovery of Self under Colonialism (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1983); and Mrinalini Sinha, Colonial Masculinity: The ‘Manly Englishman’ and the ‘Effeminate Bengali’ in the Late

in Stories of women
The inflection of desire in Yvonne Vera and Tsitsi Dangarembga
Elleke Boehmer

unworldly clients to an openly scopophilic perusal, all in the name of her implied British audience’s imperial and anthropological interests. She would have been horror-struck to hear such scrutiny described in terms of the desiring male gaze, though to the contemporary critical eye it may well invite those terms. Working under empire, her first priority was to conform to western ideas of propriety, to the persona of the unflappable, rational, Oxford-educated observer. Her example strongly demonstrates that no reading of desire, perhaps especially women’s desire, can be

in Stories of women
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Defining the nation differently
Elleke Boehmer

Sangeeta Ray, En-gendering India: Woman and Nation in Colonial and Postcolonial Narratives (Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2000), pp. 6–7. 17 Chitralekha Basu, ‘A meeting of minds’, TLS, 5212 (21 February 2003), 23. 18 To adapt from a description which is given of Astha’s poems, such same-sex ‘mindfucking’ is like ‘her own experience endlessly replayed’ (MW 79). 19 See Inderpal Grewal, Home and Harem: Nation, Gender, Empire and the Cultures of Travel (London: Leicester University Press, 1996), pp. 5–7; and also Partha Chatterjee, The Nation and its

in Stories of women
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John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’
Heather Blatt

include Barbara A. Hanawalt and Michal Kilbialka, eds, Medieval practices of space (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2000); Mayke de Jong, Frans Theuws, and Carine van Rhijn, eds, Topographies of power in the Middle Ages (Leiden: Brill, 2001); Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury, eds, Women’s space: patronage, place, and gender in the medieval church (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2005), and Geraldine Heng, Empire of magic: medieval romance and the politics of cultural fantasy (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003). 25 Mark

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

whole sentences in languages few Western readers understand. Others are part Hindi, part Gujarati and part English.’32 However, while this is a strategy straight out of the manual of postcolonial appropriation, there is a danger in overlooking the cultural specificities of Mistry’s narrative materials that inhere in the history and the experience of the Parsis. While Mistry’s texts are concerned to examine the complexities of contemporary alienated identities rather than to obsess over the bitterness of the colonial experience, the legacy of empire perforce appears

in Rohinton Mistry
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Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

something of her childhood, before death entered her world and took away first her father, then her mother. After her own demise, it comes to contain Yezad’s sacred paraphernalia, which replaces the commemorative clock in his affections. Both the toys and the clock represent more of those doomed attempts to cling on to the things of the past. Yezad’s new use of the cabinet merely perpetuates the same inclination, only with a different object. The cabinet holds framed pictures of Zarathustra, photographs of the remnants of the ancient Persian Empire, including the ruins at

in Rohinton Mistry