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Benjamin A. Saltzman

of exclusion? Intimacy's etymological opposition to the external certainly suggests so. Moreover, when intimacy informs the nature of community, as community is often constructed and conceived around an enclosing or unifying identity within which intimacy becomes the operative feature, community and its relation to exteriority become more complicated. The dissymmetry of the Other's perspective in relation to a community's homogeneity, for example, has provoked Maurice Blanchot to examine ‘whether the community … does not in the end always

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Agency in the Finnsburg episode
Mary Kate Hurley

That the poem conflates the register of complaint with the register of defilement and violation suggests that words, in this context, have extreme power. In this instance, even speaking of the past as a way to complain of one's condition can violate a fragile peace. Put another way: words can undo what treasure is meant to ensure. They can do so because they change the nature of the thing they describe – as a result, they have force in the world. That words can themselves have agency is hardly a new observation. 23

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Intimate relations
Irina Dumitrescu

battle in God's war.) While Beowulf and Andreas have been spotted together for about a century and a half, they usually only prompt the question: ‘Are they or aren't they?’ Few critics have wondered about the nature of their intimacy. The major exception is Richard North, who, in an essay in his and Michael Bintley's edition of Andreas , has attempted to tease out the nuances of this strange romance. North addresses some of the best-known borrowings from Beowulf : the

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral
Heather Blatt

in these ways points to the generalized nature of medieval reading as embodied experience, and to the specific functioning of ­architectural reading practice. Consequently, in turning to architectural reading as the practice through which the wall texts of the Percy estates and MS Royal 18.D.ii can be apprehended, the body assumes a key role in constituting meaning through the experience of reading. As noted above, the meaning thus constituted will differ when considering the locations and reading experiences of the wall texts. First considering the texts as

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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Daniel C. Remein and Erica Weaver

organism, but neither does the latter rule out the possibility of historiographical and community-catalysing intimacies. The intimacy of this sort of ‘touch’ should be apparent in considering Beowulf in its persistently intractable, enigmatic, and materially incomplete state. Just as the poem's brightest and most glorious halls are also some of its most precarious spaces, the precarious nature of the survival of the poem itself is difficult to forget now that its brittle pages must be reinforced by protective supports. Indeed, in literal terms

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

, 2009 ; Chapman et al., 1981 ; Parker Pearson, 1999 : 73). Gravegoods were deliberately used to dress a corpse or placed into a grave, and so they may convey specific and meaningful messages to different groups of people. The nature of the message is entangled within their relationships; however, some of these messages can be explored. Furnished graves often included sets of objects: a furnished male burial is one with a weapon set, a shield and spear; a woman’s burial is furnished with a pair of brooches (Härke, 1994; Stoodley, 1999 ). These material

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
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The literature of pietists (Ashkenazic hasidim)
Simha Goldin

for drinking—and he is not required to immerse himself in the mikveh). Notwithstanding, heavy duties are imposed upon him so that he may begin the process of teshuvah (repentance). First of all, and before all else, he must return to Judaism those whom he converted to Christianity, even if this will subject him to danger, quite literally; until that point, ‘he is not taken back’ for ‘how can his transgressions be atoned?’ That is, by its very nature atonement depends upon the correction of the harm he has caused.4 On yet a third level, we find the attitude towards

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
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Simha Goldin

descendant of those who stood at Sinai and received that promise. This approach is closely related to the attitudes examined during the course of this study, according to which the nature of the Jew is not subject to change; hence, even if he converts to Christianity and is now immersed in the impurity of the Christian religion, which is seen as tantamount to idolatry, he still remains a ‘New Christian,’ a Jew in essence. We have seen above how this statement, applied to an apostate, changes due to the influence of historical events. Did the attitude concerning one who

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
Simha Goldin

this Yom Tov was harassed by a demon who showed him the form of ‘warp and woof’—i.e., the cross— and tried to persuade him to engage in idolatry. The source adds that Yom Tov’s father, upon hearing of this, did not leave his room, did not interrupt his studies, and did not shed a single tear. The father’s behavior may have been because of the son’s suicide, which is prohibited according to halakhah or, what seems more likely, as an expression of the problematic nature of this son, who was evidently ‘fascinated’ by Christianity and drew close to it, a phenomenon

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe
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Simha Goldin

halakhic background here is the need to make decisions regarding what to do with such women. As in many other situations, the halakhic authorities attempted a decision on the basis of precedent through use of an earlier, similar discussion in the Talmud. The Mishnah and the Talmud contain discussions clarifying the circumstances under which a woman who has been held captive may return to her husband (after her husband, who is obligated to redeem her from captivity, in fact did so). The discussions there revolve in practice around the question of the nature of the captors

in Apostasy and Jewish identity in High Middle Ages Northern Europe