Search results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 73 items for :

  • Intervention x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
Clear All
Martha Graham, dance and politics

explain the tension between their centrality in twentieth-​century choreographic revolutions and absence within the world of political theory. Interventions in and through the female body are now taking centre stage, after years of being shifted to the wings of political philosophy. Some analyses in dance studies have focused upon Graham’s artistic response to the political events of her time. Helen Thomas quotes from an interview with Graham claiming that there was no intention on her part to choreograph dances of social or political protest (Thomas 50 50 Dance and

in Dance and politics
The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s

of this publicity. Peace Corps publicity explained the nature of international development to the broader public in particular ways. First, by focusing on volunteers’ altruistic intentions rather than the effectiveness of their actions on the ground, Peace Corps publicity portrayed international development as a humanitarian project. By presenting US intervention as a positive expression of American

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Learning from the case of Kosovo

violence between its two main ethnic groups or the ethics and legality of the NATO intervention there in 1999. Unlike other civil wars, the economic dynamics of this conflict have received much less attention in terms of academic investigations into the political-economy of conflict. However, the same economic processes and relationships which in both academic and policy circles are cited as impacting more ‘infamous’ war economies, such as those in Sierra Leone and Afghanistan, have been well documented by aid practitioners and policy makers as having impacted upon the

in Building a peace economy?
Open Access (free)
The co-operative movement, development and the nation-state, 1889–1939

Civilising Rural Ireland examines how modern Ireland emerged out of the social and economic transformation prompted by the rural co-operative movement. The movement emerged in response to systemic economic problems that arose throughout the nineteenth century and coincided with a wide-ranging project of cultural nationalism. Within a short space of time the co-operative movement established a swathe of creameries, agricultural societies and credit societies, leading to a radical reorganisation of rural Ireland and helping to create a distinctive Irish political economy. The work of overlooked co-operative experts is critically examined for the first time and reinserted into the process of state development. The interventions of these organisers, intellectuals and farmers built up key institutions that shaped everyday life across rural communities. The movement weathered war and revolution, to become an indispensable part of an Irish state infrastructure after independence in 1922. The strained relationship and economic rivalry that developed between Irish and British co-operators is also explored in order to illuminate the changing relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom from an economic perspective. Civilising Rural Ireland will appeal to a wide audience interested in modern Irish history and readers are introduced to an eclectic range of personalities who shared an interest in co-operation and whose actions possessed important consequences for the way Ireland developed. The creative use of local and national sources, many of which are examined for the first time, mean the book offers a new perspective on an important period in the making of modern Ireland.

best price upon the market. The IAOS remained an institution in demand among members and its continued work amid moments of political change implied an element of continuity within the state of Ireland. Increased instances of state intervention that drastically shaped everyday life across Britain and Ireland dramatically affected the lives of rural people. Farming regulations, control orders and the repercussions of an economic blockade intensified demand for Irish foodstuffs across the United Kingdom. However, such state interventions needed

in Civilising rural Ireland
DSI approaches and behaviours

, and in ways which negatively impact upon the capacity of actors to positively transform economies, there is also a degree of heterogeneity in the response of operational actors. In other words, some actors have manoeuvred within and around the typical liberal modes of intervention and attempted to integrate more contextspecific, politically aware modes of programming with the aim contributing to the wider aims of positive transformation defined and described in Chapter 1. Whilst imperfect, these examples showed that innovation and attention to social, political and

in Building a peace economy?

-President of the Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction (DATI). Ever the patrician, Plunkett remained an unapologetic defender of the role played by members of the landlord class in the regeneration of Irish soil and society. His faith in the innate moral and intellectual superiority of his class made Plunkett a somewhat problematic leader for a movement committed to the pursuit of non-political interventions. The composition of the IAOS Executive was certainly an obvious target for criticism, although the story proved more complex at a local level. Plunkett

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)

action and our interpretation of politics and political theory more broadly. Jodi Dean’s careful examination of the Occupy movement in The Communist Horizon, in which, quite literally, bodies intervened in public spaces in order to reconsider distributive justice; Jane Bennett’s crucial intervention into the humanist and language-​driven world of political theory, Vibrant Matter; and Diana Coole and Samantha Frost’s edited collection New Materialisms opened up a vista for scholars and theorists seeking new ways to consider the body in its relationship to the physical

in Dance and politics
Gumboot dance in South Africa

performances. I release the intervention illuminated in the choreography of Martha Graham into conditions in which speech was rendered impossible by economic, legal and political frameworks. Gumboot dance developed as a method of communication within systems of racial segregation in which speech was prohibited. Verbal communication was not allowed in the gold mines, nor were black South Africans allowed to enter the public sphere, hence their opinions and voices were silenced. I argue that the development of gumboot dance allowed for two parallel processes:  firstly, the

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
The dancer of the future dancing radical hope

Eleanor’s own inscription upon history. Further, I draw my use of this text from the powerful reading of this argument in context in Rachel Holmes’s groundbreaking biography where the use of those categories is intimately related to Eleanor’s understanding of history; in which beyond the dialectical view presented by her father she sees her intervention as the next stage as ‘the sequel’ (Holmes 2014: 449). Eleanor Marx (known as ‘Tussy’) provides us with what these radical democratic critiques of Lear’s virtue ethics seek: a category of action that in its very becoming

in Dance and politics