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  • Manchester History of Medicine x
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Duncan Wilson

a ‘biological time-bomb’, whose dangers equalled those of nuclear weapons and threatened ‘nothing less than the break-up of civilization as we know it’.7 Broadsheet and tabloid newspapers also linked biological research to fears over nuclear weapons, claiming that biologists were ‘taking over where the physicists left off’ and questioning whether they could be trusted to ‘handle the properties of life, death and destruction … as casually as if they were sunflower seeds’.8 Television coverage was similarly foreboding. A BBC documentary screened as part of the

in The making of British bioethics
The cultural construction of opposition to immunisation in India
Niels Brimnes

opinions by influential men (and a single woman). Billimoria's own contribution ‘Vaccination: A Fallacy’ attacked the practice on several fronts. He duly began with the pain caused to the calves used in the production of vaccine lymph, but soon turned to the more ‘utilitarian’ argument that vaccination had no effect. Referring to official statistics he claimed that there were as many deaths from vaccination as from smallpox itself in

in The politics of vaccination
Ana María Carrillo

instruction, and learned to prepare the rabies vaccine. Early that year, he inoculated a Mexican boy 11 and established the Anti-Rabies Preventive Inoculation Service, as a branch of the Superior Board of Health. 12 From 1888 to 1910, the board administered 11,177 inoculations – with only thirteen deaths recorded among the recipients. 13 By 1909, five states of the Mexican republic had created anti-rabies centres. In 1895, the Pathological Anatomy

in The politics of vaccination
Bonnie Evans

Psychology , a major crisis about evidence and instincts also exploded within the British Psychoanalytic Society between Melanie Klein and Anna Freud. The story of the ‘controversial discussions’ has often been told against a background of personal infighting following the death of Freud, sparked by disagreements between the established group of psychoanalysts in Britain and the

in The metamorphosis of autism
Mary Warnock, embryos and moral expertise
Duncan Wilson

conscientious doctor who had acted ‘within the professionally accepted limits of paediatric practice’.62 Arthur also received public support from Jonathan Glover, who wrote in the London Review of Books that ‘a verdict of guilty would have been a morally undeserved calamity’.63 Glover used the Arthur case to reiterate the main points of his 1977 book Causing Death and Saving Lives, exploring the moral implications of non-treatment and promoting the benefits of ‘applied ethics’. He stressed that deciding whether or not to treat disabled babies was ‘not simply a legal or

in The making of British bioethics
William Muraskin

was debated with great vigour at one of the sessions, where the proponents had to admit they lost ground in bitter interchanges with WHO representatives, who championed primary health care and argued compellingly against an eradication programme. The fact that most polio experts did not favour polio eradication in no way stopped its proponents from their determination to move forward. Nor did the fact that polio was a disease with a low death

in The politics of vaccination
Christine E. Hallett

’s fragments are more moving than any studied account of the men’s injuries would have been. She opens a window onto a scene of suffering and endurance – but only momentarily – and she juxtaposes the scene where she is able to escape (to a slag heap) and see the ox-eye daisies, before returning the reader to the relentless reality of ‘Jack’s’ slow death:  ‘Jack is alive still but very weak and wandering, asking us all day to take off his boots; we scrabble about with his bare feet and he is happy for a moment, and then begins again.’ In the same entry, the reader is offered

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Jane Brooks

for their patients in hostile environments, frequently under fire. They had washed soldiers, fed them, provided them with pain relief and dignity and compassion in death. The nurses had supported the sick and injured combatants’ healing and given them encouragement to return to battle. Finally, on active service in the Second World War, nurses developed their practice to include scientific and highly technical work. Some of these, such as complex wound care, blood transfusions and IV therapy, were then written into the lexicon of nursing work. Other roles, such as

in Negotiating nursing
Christine E. Hallett

quiet in her Cellar-House, and delaying their journey to the base, saved lives. Indeed, she came to believe that she herself had the power to ‘bring back’ men from the brink of death: The stress of the life we were living had begun to reveal something in me which I had never suspected and which could not, surely have been the produce of the few absurd years on earth of which I was aware. I possessed a kind of power which seemed to be able to drag men back literally from the jaws of death. I was a fully trained nurse in the technical sense, but this was something more

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

might reduce the burden on other health services, it noted that there were 90,000 measles cases in 1986 and over 1,000 hospital admissions. Parents who did not present their children for measles vaccination were placed implicitly in the same category as people making poor dietary choices (‘obesity: a quarter of young people are overweight’), smokers (‘100,000 deaths a year … 50 million working days lost … £400 million in [NHS] treatment costs’) and drug users (‘the number of addicts newly notified in 1986 exceeded 5,000’). 10 But while this responsibility rhetoric

in Vaccinating Britain