, genocide. 1 Transnational feminist histories of race and empire meanwhile reveal the everyday, intimate politics of global racial formations, where racialised ideologies of gender, sexuality and bodies circulated between colonised territories and metropoles, indeed into any society that even aspired to the modernity of European civilisational superiority (McClintock 1995 ; Young 1995 ; Stoler 2002 ). ‘Race’ simultaneously structures new experiences of migration, informing states' classifications of who may cross borders or settle more freely or less so, and shaping

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Language games in the Kosovo war

Introduction: Kosovo as a sign The oddity of ‘humanitarian bombing’; the demonic Slobodan Milosevic; the violence of genocide; the darkness of Serb nationalism; the anguish of uprooted Kosovars; the hatred of ethnic cleansing. What took place in Kosovo fascinates us, both because of its many monsters and because of the opportunity it has offered ‘the West’ to portray itself

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Mass violence, genocide, and the ‘forensic turn’

Human remains and identification presents a pioneering investigation into the practices and methodologies used in the search for and exhumation of dead bodies resulting from mass violence. Previously absent from forensic debate, social scientists and historians here confront historical and contemporary exhumations with the application of social context to create an innovative and interdisciplinary dialogue, enlightening the political, social and legal aspects of mass crime and its aftermaths. Through a ground-breaking selection of international case studies, Human remains and identification argues that the emergence of new technologies to facilitate the identification of dead bodies has led to a “forensic turn”, normalising exhumations as a method of dealing with human remains en masse. However, are these exhumations always made for legitimate reasons? Multidisciplinary in scope, the book will appeal to readers interested in understanding this crucial phase of mass violence’s aftermath, including researchers in history, anthropology, sociology, forensic science, law, politics and modern warfare.

Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

formation, forced migration and genocide that invite seeing its past and present through the lens of ethnopolitical and religious conflict. Moreover, as part of ‘eastern’ rather than ‘western’ Europe, and without its own history as an imperial power, it did not experience the mass migration from outside ‘Europe’ of millions of people whose identities would be racialised as non-white. Studies of how ideas of ‘race’ have circulated and been adapted across the globe, for their part, themselves still almost always pass over the east of Europe and its state socialist past. The

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Rumours of bones and the remembrance of an exterminated people in Newfoundland - the emotive immateriality of human remains

-​heads. Peyton took the trap and beat the man to death.20 So it went. The Beothuk died. Shot. Choked with tuberculosis. Starving as they lost access to the cliffs, cove and beaches where they had taken capelin, salmon and gulls’ eggs. There is still disagreement about how to understand their death. Some say it was an unfortunate accident of a sort, the Beothuk being a people few in number and eking out a precarious existence on an inhospitable island.21 Others cite the stories of violence and suggest that this was genocide, if not by any organised design then certainly in

in Human remains in society
Missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa

8 Identification, politics, disciplines: missing persons and colonial skeletons in South Africa1 Nicky Rousseau Locating, exhuming, and identifying human remains associated with mass violence and genocide has come to occupy an impor­tant place in the panoply of transitional justice measures. Although such work cuts across the core transitional justice issues of justice, reparation and truth-telling, it has received surprisingly little critical attention from within the transitional justice field.2 Existing studies, with some exception, can be characterized by

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Corpses and mass violence: an inventory of the unthinkable

Introduction. Corpses and mass violence: an inventory of the unthinkable Élisabeth Anstett & Jean-Marc Dreyfus Mass violence is one of the defining phenomena of the twentieth century, which some have even called the ‘century of genocides’.1 Scarred by the Armenian genocide, the Holodomor in Ukraine, the Spanish Civil War, the Holocaust, the gulags and, more recently, the crimes against humanity committed in Bosnia, Europe alone offers a range of examples of such extreme events.2 These outbreaks of mass violence particularly affected civilians, unlike most

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
The tales destruction tells

field of knowledge, was partially constituted around the study of funerary rituals and the social logics of their perpetuation.5 How­ ever, despite mass violence and genocide increasingly appearing as structural elements of the legacy of the twentieth century, and despite research in the fields of Holocaust studies and genocide studies developing rapidly, the dead body seems to elude the atten­tion of researchers, whether historians, anthropologists, or lawyers. Very few of them have taken an interest in what became of the millions of corpses produced by mass crimes

in Destruction and human remains
Open Access (free)

changes that have occurred in terms of both public sensitivities and the legal situation is provided by the passing of the UK’s 2004 Human Tissue Act and the creation of the Human Tissue Authority, which aim to oversee the transportation, storage and use of human bodies, organs and tissues in the context of scientific research, education and transplant surgery. The difficult questions posed by the atrocities of the twentieth century have added to the issues raised by corpses and human remains preserved outside of funerary spaces. Genocides and 2 2   Human remains in

in Human remains in society
Integrative concepts for a criminology of mass violence

, articulated well with the dominant racist–eugenicist colonial mind-set that violently repressed and exploited so-called ‘lesser’ peoples. Its methods were also taken up avidly in Weimar Germany and later National Socialist Germany,8 where elastic terms such ‘asocial’ and ‘criminal type’, along with the pseudo-science of racial assessment and categorization, were placed firmly in the service of peacetime terror and wartime genocide. As some late-modern criminologists have noted, criminology during this period was often complicit in the discourse and practices of mass

in Human remains and mass violence