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Laura Chrisman

constitutive indeterminacy whereby Spivak’s gestures towards historical particularity ambiguously affirm both a contingent materialism and an absolute idealism. European history happens to coincide with the hegemony of imperialism, such that the sum total of European history is inextricable from an imperialist trajectory that continues in overdetermined ways to control the conditions of contemporary cultural and intellectual production. At the same time, it seems, the designation ‘imperialism’ applies to the conditions of narrative, representation and knowledge production

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Series:

Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

development facilitate a way to justify a reality of war, poverty and impunity. As such, an obvious starting point from which to look for resistance is the idealism on which promises are made. These powerful promises seem to be enough to request the population to keep waiting, obeying, paying taxes, providing for themselves and facing repression in return for raising concerns. The implication is that peacebuilding’s discourse rests on people’s aspirations, and not the other way around. To this extent, peacebuilding is hardly Western or liberal, but is better seen as an

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Digital maps and anchored time

The case for practice theory

Matthew Hanchard

practice theory moves beyond the moment of enactment, the actants involved, moments of translation or the assembled network. Instead, the focus lies on historically informed human action (practices not practice) – what people do – with the practices carried out as constitutive of social order (Giddens, 1984) – and not the individuals or maps directly. Extending practice theory, Swidler’s (2001) proposal for a focus on bodilyinscribed (embodied) action is a useful addition. She avoids idealism-­materialism dualisms to focus on practices simultaneously in two directions

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Mistry’s Hollow Men

Language, lies and the crisis of representation in Such a Long Journey

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Peter Morey

State of Emergency. Likewise, the existence or otherwise of a spiritual realm of ideal forms is not really the issue. Rather, Mistry appears to understand the necessity of some form of idealism to the whole concept of life’s journey: whether it be an ideal of family life, of which the Noble unit inevitably falls short, or the belief that politics ought to be motivated by a sense of social responsibility and altruism instead of self-interest and corruption. Typical of Mistry’s attitude to human belief systems – that they are a bulwark against contingency and chaos – is

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Running repairs

Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters

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Peter Morey

worlds’, that ‘kingdom of ends’, in Kantian terms, where everything is in its place and nothing contradicts the requirements of reason. It is a mark of Jehangir’s development in the epilogue that he has moved on from such illusory idealism and is coming to terms with the moral complexity of things as they are, just as his father seems determined to journey in the opposite direction. The earlier, more open Yezad at one stage reflects on the need the survivors of partition seem to feel to go on telling their stories: ‘like Indian authors writing about that period

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‘Sacred spaces’

Writing home in recent Irish memoirs and autobiographies (John McGahern’s Memoir, Hugo Hamilton’s The Speckled People, Seamus Deane’s Reading in the Dark and John Walsh’s The Falling Angels)

Stephen Regan

complexity of any autobiographical narrative that seeks to capture both the intensity of childhood feelings and the more circumspect nature of adult recollection. It is not surprising, therefore, that initially McGahern appears to invoke the romantic idealism of Wordsworth, for whom the child is father of the man: There are many such lanes all around where I live, and in certain rare moments over the years while walking in these lanes I have come into an extraordinary sense of security, a deep peace, in which I feel that I can live for ever. I suspect it is no more than

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‘What do I say when they wheel out their dead?’

The representation of violence in Northern Irish art

Shane Alcobia-Murphy

by Charles Harvey Brewster. Blight’s analysis argues that those who fought in the Civil War 9780719075636_4_017.qxd 16/2/09 302 9:30 AM Page 302 After words experienced conflicting emotions, running ‘from naïveté to mature realism, from romantic idealism to sheer terror, from self-pity to enduring devotion’.70 The specific line taken from Blight cites his observation that combatants often mask ugliness and horror when writing about war, not only as a self-protective measure, but also as a means of shielding loved ones from atrocity: ‘[s

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Unlocking the talent of every citizen

Debates about potential and ambition in British socialist thought

Jeremy Nuttall

theme of this chapter. Rodney Barker has analysed the Labour Party’s approach to educational issues in the first half of the twentieth century (Barker 1972). Steven Fielding, Peter Thompson and Nick Tiratsoo have explored Labour’s perceptions in the 1940s of the limits to both people’s political idealism and their enthusiasm for cultural ‘enlightenment’ (Fielding et al. 1995). Lawrence Black examined the impact of cultural and social changes during the ‘age of affluence’ in the 1950s and 1960s on socialist attitudes towards popular culture (Black 2003). David Marquand

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Beside the west

Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame

Elleke Boehmer

context suggests, Vera is concerned throughout The Stone Virgins heavily to qualify the valorised meanings of ‘independence’, ‘nation’, ‘land’, by plunging her characters without apparent explanation into horrifying situations of civil conflict and physical torture. Even the shreds of idealism that in the earlier novel clung to these terms are obliterated. The mutilated Nonceba, Thenjiwe’s younger sister, alone survives the agonies inflicted upon the community. For the rest, the expectations of independence, with which Mahlatini the store-owner fully identified, are

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Susan Manning

’experience of the novels, his version of chivalric romance embodies a very real relationship between Scott and the Civil War as elements unassimilable in the redaction of an American post-Romantic ideology of nationhood – an embodiment that itself exemplifies a wider problem of the failure of idealism, the loss of ‘purity’, for nineteenth-century American writers.57 22 Susan Manning Notes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Walter Scott, Ivanhoe [1820], ed. Graham Tulloch, The Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley novels, Vol. 8, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press